environment

From Texas StandardJason Fry is a filmmaker from Brownsville. We met at a diner there. He told me what happened to him the afternoon of Dec. 8 as he drove down Highway 48, from Brownsville to Port Isabel.

“It was low visibility, and all of a sudden a pelican dropped out of the sky right in front of my truck,” he said.

To say President-elect Donald Trump's incoming administration has public health and environmental advocates worried may be an understatement.  Like a lot of Republicans, Trump wants to roll back environmental protections and some people are already protesting his positions in the streets.

But, beyond protest, how will these groups push their agendas under the next administration? 

There’s a trend in San Antonio that seems to be on the rise and it isn’t good for people or the environment.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

The San Antonio River Authority is spending $25,000 to trap a non-native rodent that’s wreaking havoc along the river banks.

The banks of the San Antonio River at first appear lush with vegetation, but once you look closely, you see the barren spots. That’s because the nutria, native to South America, have moved in. They can’t resist devouring the stems and roots of the plants that grow here.

So, the San Antonio River Authority has set 60 traps that span roughly 5 miles from Eagleland to the Mission Reach to catch the nutria which are sometimes called “river rats.”

President Obama and his counterparts from Canada and Mexico are preparing to unveil an ambitious new goal for generating carbon-free power when they meet this week in Ottawa.

The three leaders are expected to set a target for North America to get 50 percent of its electricity from nonpolluting sources by 2025. That's up from about 37 percent last year.

Aides acknowledge that's a "stretch goal," requiring commitments over and above what the three countries agreed to as part of the Paris climate agreement.

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