flooding

Tropical Depression Bill, formerly Tropical Storm Bill, is making its way north across Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas, bringing more rain to an area that’s already seen more than its fair share in recent weeks.

But there has been an upside to the past month of heavy rains: some parts of Texas have finally emerged from years of devastating drought conditions. Take Wichita Falls, Texas, where a year ago the city’s water supply reservoirs were less than a quarter full, and the city was at Stage 5 drought emergency conditions.

Remnants Of Bill Move Just West Of I-35, Heavy Rain Ahead, Tornado Watch On

Jun 17, 2015
National Weather Service

SAN ANTONIO — Flood-weary Texans were bracing for heavy rain and possible flooding as the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill crept further inland early Wednesday.

The center of the storm was expected to move northward just west of the Interstate 35 corridor, dropping 4 to 5 inches of rain on areas of Central Texas, still cleaning up and recovering from Memorial Day weekend floods that left 14 dead and two missing along the Blanco River alone in Blanco and Hays counties.

The National Hurricane Center said early Wednesday the storm was about 45 miles south of Waco and moving north at about 13 mph. Flash flood watches and warnings were in effect for the area, and Gov. Greg Abbott was expected to receive a briefing from state emergency officials Wednesday morning in Austin.

Courtesy: National Weather Service

UPDATE, 1:30 p.m.:

The eye of Tropical Storm Bill is currently near Victoria, Texas,  after making landfall at Matagorda Bay. National Weather Service Meteorologist Aaron Treadway told TPR News Bill will lose some power by the time it makes its way to San Antonio and Central Texas.  

“By the time [the eye] gets up here it will be a tropical depression. As we get closer to that circulation it will be more of a constant rain as that circulation moves from the coast north through the state of Texas,” he said. 

Ryan E. Poppe

The sound of chainsaws cutting through driftwood or downed trees is commonplace these days along the Blanco River. In May, raging floodwaters lifted homes off their foundations and ripped 50-year old cypress trees out of the ground.  

Linda Moore had about four feet of water in her home and lost nearly lost everything in the flood. “A lot of the trees are down, almost all the trees down by the river are down. My rainwater collection tank floated a little bit. Both my cars were filled with water and totaled,” Moore elaborated.

Parts of Texas have barely had time to recover from the last round of flooding rains, but the National Weather Service is warning that there's more to come this week.

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