Courtesy: National Weather Service

UPDATE, 1:30 p.m.:

The eye of Tropical Storm Bill is currently near Victoria, Texas,  after making landfall at Matagorda Bay. National Weather Service Meteorologist Aaron Treadway told TPR News Bill will lose some power by the time it makes its way to San Antonio and Central Texas.  

“By the time [the eye] gets up here it will be a tropical depression. As we get closer to that circulation it will be more of a constant rain as that circulation moves from the coast north through the state of Texas,” he said. 

Ryan E. Poppe

The sound of chainsaws cutting through driftwood or downed trees is commonplace these days along the Blanco River. In May, raging floodwaters lifted homes off their foundations and ripped 50-year old cypress trees out of the ground.  

Linda Moore had about four feet of water in her home and lost nearly lost everything in the flood. “A lot of the trees are down, almost all the trees down by the river are down. My rainwater collection tank floated a little bit. Both my cars were filled with water and totaled,” Moore elaborated.

Parts of Texas have barely had time to recover from the last round of flooding rains, but the National Weather Service is warning that there's more to come this week.

Courtesy: Joanne Hall / http://hallsontheroad.blogspot.com/

MIAMI — The National Hurricane Center says a broad area of low pressure near the Yucatan Peninsula could brew nasty weather along the Texas and Louisiana coasts and inland Monday night and Tuesday.

Hurricane center spokesman Dennis Feltgen says the low may develop into a tropical system. But he says that whether it does or not, it’s likely to slam into the middle and upper Texas coast and west Louisiana with at least 4 to 6 inches of rain and 40-mph winds.

He says that includes parts of Texas that were flooded only weeks ago.

GEAA / http://www.aquiferalliance.net/

LUBBOCK — The torrential storms of last month essentially ended one of Texas’ worst-ever droughts, but much of the excess water has already flowed into the Gulf of Mexico or will evaporate by year’s end.

With a wary eye toward the next prolonged dry-streak that inevitably will come, some think expanding the use of underground aquifers may help slake the thirst of Texas’ rapidly growing population.

Three trillion gallons of water gushed from swollen Texas rivers into the Gulf of Mexico in May, and another 2 trillion gallons will likely evaporate from state reservoirs by year’s end. Combined, the lost water would be enough to serve Texas’ booming population for an entire year.