foster care

A federal judge in Corpus Christi has ordered the state to make sweeping changes to its foster care system. The judge’s ruling comes two years after finding the state’s system to be unconstitutional.


From Texas Standard.

A six-year-old class action lawsuit over the system of foster care in Texas may be reaching a climax. It’s the case in which a federal judge found Texas’ foster care system to be so dangerous to foster kids as to be unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Janis Graham Jack has called the system that cares for some 10,700 kids “broken.” Now, court special masters are making recommendations that are sure to attract pushback from the state of Texas, which has been aggressively privatizing the foster care system.

Robert Garrett of the Dallas Morning News reports Texas could be forced by the court to recruit thousands of foster parents, as the crisis in child protective services continues.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT News

Over 2,200 minors in the care of Texas' foster care system reside in Harris County – the area most affected by Hurricane Harvey. As a result, 1,200 children were forced to relocate, according to the Texas Department of Family and Protective services.  

From Texas Standard:

Texas Standard spoke with Kaysie Taccetta of the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services about the new "community-based model" for foster care in the state. One service provider in North Texas is already working within the model. The Standard paid the group a visit. Listen to that part of the story below.

On Sept. 1, hundreds of new laws took effect in Texas. A number were aimed at improving the state's child welfare system. Failure to do so was not an option.

Governor Greg Abbott signed several foster care reform bills on May 31 aimed at providing more money and resources for families and caregivers. TPR's Louisa Jonas takes a look at challenges that need to be addressed.


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