Fronteras

This Week On Fronteras:

-- The families and classmates of 43 missing Mexican college students traveled across the U.S. to raise awareness for their situation.

-- A movement is underway to prevent suicides by freeing immigrant mothers and their children from detention centers.

-- From New Mexico, here’s some stereotype defying information about gun violence.

-- The best bilingual teacher in the U.S. hails from Dallas.

-- A talk with the directors of the new border documentary, Western.

KUNM Public Radio

This Week on Fronteras:

·       Mexican police score a big arrest in the bloody drug war along the border

·       A Texas county refuses to take federal drug cases coming from border patrol checkpoints.

·       In one New Mexico community water from the Rio Grande has long been important for sustaining crops and religious ceremonies. Now residents say it’s polluted.

·       Crossing the U.S.-Mexico border turned out tragically for one young man who has been in a coma for 15 years.

Mose Buchele / NPR StateImpact

  On Fronteras:

-- Energy companies navigate fluctuating crude oil prices.  Who will survive?

-- Where is all the stolen oil-field equipment headed?

-- Trucking oil and gas is leading to treacherous travel on Texas roads.

-- The building of energy pipelines creates jobs, but how will that affect the environment in Texas and New Mexico? 

-- A new monument honors a Mexican who signed the Texas Declaration of Independence and fought for Tejano rights

Wikimedia

This week on Fronteras: 

Immigration-  A Texas Judge freezes President Obama’s immigration protection plan that was supposed to start this week. The Obama administration says it will appeal but 26 states are fighting it. We’ll examine who’s against it and which immigrants are affected and how.  At the Mexican Consulate in Dallas, residents affected by the hold say they’re worried.

Children in Detention-  Attorneys claim immigrant children held in detention centers are not getting basic protections.

Mentally Ill Inmates-  In New Mexico, a look at efforts to help mentally ill inmates find the treatment they need when they get out of prison.  One mother tried to get help for her son, but it came too late.

We talk we the director of CineFestival, the nation’s longest running Chicano film festival.

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

This week on Fronteras:

-- How did measles, once eliminated in the United States, make a comeback?  One congressman is using insensitive language and blaming immigrants for the recent outbreak. But has immigration really caused measles to return?  Fronteras examines that concern and the loaded language that surrounds illegal immigration. 

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