Fronteras

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  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas spends millions on border security but wants the Obama administration to pay for it.

--Texas farmers survived the drought.  Now they’re working to survive recent flooding.

--Water problems also are plaguing New Mexico where runoff from the storms is polluting the Rio Grande.

--A Fort Worth organization is helping young people recover from the financial consequences of gang life.

--An Austin mother in public housing is struggling to keep her son in one school. 

Joy Diaz / KUT Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

--A half-million people on the Texas-Mexico border live in colonias which often lack running water, electricity and basic services.  The Obama Administration wants border states to spend more money to improve life in these communities.

--The Cardinal considered to be Pope Francis’ most reliable advisor blames Mexican drugs lords for the surge of Central American children crossing the border into the United States.

--Attorneys get courtroom training on how to win asylum for detained immigrant mothers and children.

Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

--A coalition comes together to fight unprecedented natural gas pipelines in West Texas near Big Bend that would transport energy to Mexico. Residents are worried.

--A proposed Texas law pushes for an end to so called sanctuary cities.  But San Antonio police say the city is safer because immigrants can report crimes without fear of deportation.

--It’s Fiesta time in San Antonio and that means medal madness. Everyone’s having a good time collecting medals during the celebration. 

Paul Flahive / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras: 

--A look at how undocumented immigrants without social security numbers pay taxes, and why the IRS doesn’t disclose their identities.

--A legal border crossing in Texas stimulates economies and relations on both sides as it celebrates the second anniversary of its opening.

--Mexican teachers experience Houston classrooms in an international, cultural exchange program.

--A unique protest in support of an arrested Cuban artist brings museums together in solidarity.

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