Fronteras

Paul Flahive / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras: 

--A look at how undocumented immigrants without social security numbers pay taxes, and why the IRS doesn’t disclose their identities.

--A legal border crossing in Texas stimulates economies and relations on both sides as it celebrates the second anniversary of its opening.

--Mexican teachers experience Houston classrooms in an international, cultural exchange program.

--A unique protest in support of an arrested Cuban artist brings museums together in solidarity.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

-- It’s been more than four years since President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act. More than 11 million people have signed up for health insurance, but there are still Latinos in Texas who are uninsured.

-- In New Mexico, another healthcare dilemma — a behavioral health provider will end its programs just two years after opening, leaving many criminal offenders without services.

Dianna Douglas / KERA

  — Texas’ Hispanic and black students are rocking the national charts when it comes to high school graduation rates. Fronteras takes a look at the reasons and whether students are also better prepared for college and career.

— In Dallas minority students excel on Advanced Placement tests for colleges.  We take a look at why that’s happening.

—Sen. Ted Cruz, the first official presidential candidate for the 2016 elections, may speak at Texas A&M International’s graduation ceremony in Laredo.  Could he be trying to make inroads with Hispanic voters?

This Week On Fronteras:

-- The families and classmates of 43 missing Mexican college students traveled across the U.S. to raise awareness for their situation.

-- A movement is underway to prevent suicides by freeing immigrant mothers and their children from detention centers.

-- From New Mexico, here’s some stereotype defying information about gun violence.

-- The best bilingual teacher in the U.S. hails from Dallas.

-- A talk with the directors of the new border documentary, Western.

KUNM Public Radio

This Week on Fronteras:

·       Mexican police score a big arrest in the bloody drug war along the border

·       A Texas county refuses to take federal drug cases coming from border patrol checkpoints.

·       In one New Mexico community water from the Rio Grande has long been important for sustaining crops and religious ceremonies. Now residents say it’s polluted.

·       Crossing the U.S.-Mexico border turned out tragically for one young man who has been in a coma for 15 years.

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