From Texas Standard:

Picture this: A prominent Republican speaks at one of the country's most liberal enclaves, The University of California at Berkeley. Not only is it a full house, he gets a standing ovation.


Ted Cruz is in Texas, campaigning hard to raise money this week. Scott Walker was in San Antonio yesterday hoping to bone up on his Lone Star numbers. Rick Perry may not make it out of the state.

Texas has connections with more than a third of the GOP presidential field and the ones that will make to Super Tuesday, sure do want to win it.

What is the state of the current field of Presidential candidates?


Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

WASHINGTON — Worried about “Republican-on-Republican violence,” top party donors are taking action, with one firing off a letter calling for more civility and another seeking to block businessman Donald Trump from the debate stage altogether.

Foster Friess, a Wyoming-based investor and one of the party’s top 20 donors in the last presidential contest, issued a letter to 16 White House prospects and the Republican National Committee late last week calling for candidates to stay on the “civility reservation.”

“Our candidates will benefit if they all submit to Ronald Reagan’s 11th Commandment, ‘Thou shall not speak ill of a fellow Republican,’” Friess wrote in a letter sent to Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus. A copy was obtained by The Associated Press.

In the dispatch, Friess cites the backing of casino magnate Sheldon Adelson and Chicago Cubs co-owner Todd Ricketts. “Would you join the effort to inspire a more civil way of making their points?” Friess wrote. “If they drift off the ‘civility reservation,’ let’s all immediately communicate that to them.”

State of Texas

AUSTIN — A broad coalition of Texas Tea Party groups has mounted a scathing criticism of the state’s GOP lawmakers, including its top two Republicans, arguing they failed to ensure that the Legislature kept key conservative promises.

In an open letter Thursday, signed by 28 grassroots leaders and published on the website representing the Texas Tea Party coalition of groups, they worried that, with the June 1 end of session looming, many of their top priorities didn't have enough time left to pass.

It stated: “Frankly, we don’t care how hard or how long they have to work to get the job done, either. Too many evenings, Fridays, and weekends have gone by with no committee meetings and no floor action for us to accept the tired and politically convenient excuse ‘we ran out of time.’”

Marco Rubio, the charismatic, Hispanic, young (and even younger-looking) freshman senator from Florida is launching his campaign for the White House Monday in Miami.

Rubio, 43, will be entering a growing field of candidates. Right now, he's considered a second-tier candidate, polling behind Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the man Rubio has called a mentor.

That could change once he gets in. Rubio's advisers believe he has a path to the nomination, with assets few other candidates can match.