Health

Science & Technology
9:36 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Prostate Cancer Risk Calculator 2.0 Uses Emojis To Explain Variables Of Risk

The 2.0 Prostate Risk Calculator was developed at the Cancer Therapy & Research Center at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio

  In the really old days, they were called pictographs; later they were called emoticons. Now, though, they’re called emojis, a new word originating in Japan for those smiley-face, thumbs-up and I-heart-you icons all over electronic devices. Emojis now include airplanes, jack-o-lanterns, kittens and just about every other animal – or fruit or facial expression – that one can imagine.

So why not use them in medicine?

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The Source - September 9, 2014
11:42 am
Tue September 9, 2014

The Source: Obesity In America, Limited Signs Of Hope

Credit The State Of Obesity 2014 / http://bit.ly/1nJ4TqS

We are fat--capital "F" fat. But after years of public health campaigns stressing the importance of exercise, healthy eating and access to healthy foods there are some positives to report.

In fact the authors changed the name of the study after 10 years from "F" is For Fat to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America to highlight the limited signs of hope there is for the United States.

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The Source - August 21, 2014
10:47 am
Thu August 21, 2014

The Source: Prescribing Veggies For Wellness

San Antonio Food Bank

The San Antonio Food Bank is launching a new program that aims to better tackle chronic disease through healthy eating. Their plan get doctors to prescribe produce and then the food bank will redeem the prescription regardless of cost.

It's called Pharm2Farm and it launches today.

Guest:

  • Eric Cooper, president of the San Antonio Food Bank

*This is the second segment in the August 21 edition of The Source, which airs at 3 p.m. on KSTX 89.1 FM. 

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Community
4:44 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

Robin Williams' Death Changing The Conversation About Depression Among Youth

The tragic death of one of the world’s best-loved comedians may serve to change the public conversation about depression. Robin Williams’ suicide has more people talking about taking a greater role in looking out for loved ones that could be suffering.

Everyone seemed to love him, but no one seemed to understand the depth of his depression. From Facebook and Twitter to news website, the actor's death has fueled a new conversation about depression, about sensitivity, about looking for signs among our friends and family.

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Children's Hospital of San Antonio
1:18 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Group Of Gamers Bring Video Game Relief To Children's Hospital Of San Antonio

7-year-old Albany Garaby plays Injustice on an Xbox 360 with her cousin, Mercedes.
Joey Palacios TPR News

A group of kids at the Children’s Hospital of San Antonio got their fill of video games on Thursday as a team of gamers who raise money for the hospital brought in plenty of distractions.

The fifth floor of the hospital was packed with Xboxes, Playstations, board games and children who are not too shy to take advantage of them. During the two hours the room was set up, 7-year-old Albany Garaby said she got to play some of her favorite games.

“Batman, NBA, and Angry Birds,” she said with controller in hand while playing Injustice on an Xbox.

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Science & Technology
4:51 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

UTHSC Scientists Seeking Patent For Method Of Killing Mouth Tumors

Credit UT Health Science Center

Scientists at the UT Health Science Center have discovered a way to kill malignant tumors in the mouth efficiently and without harming the nearby healthy tissue.

The discovery has led to a patent application for the method of directly injecting cancerous tumors with the drug capsazepine.

Oral cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the U.S. and 40,000 new cases are reported every year. Studies have shown it’s more painful than any other cancer.

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Community Health
4:31 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Chikungunya Virus Reported In Five Texas Counties, Including Bexar County

Credit Bexar County

Although a handful of Texas residents have been identified as being infected with the chikungunya virus, officials are working to get ahead of any possible panic situations in Bexar County.

The Bexar County Emergency Management Office and the Metro Helath Department briefed county commissioners on the situation with the chikungunya virus in the local area. So far, cases have been confirmed in Gonzales, Harris, Travis, Williamson and Bexar Counties.

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Science & Technology
1:16 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

University Hospital Taking NICU Ophthalmology To Rural Areas

Ophthalmologist Dr. Clio Harper, M.D., examines the eyes of a premature infant at the University Hospital NICU. Dr. Harper comes to San Antonio from Austin each week to examine and treat infants with Retinopathy of Prematurity, or ROP
Credit Elizabeth Allen / UTHSC

University Hospital is participating in a study that doctors hope will save the eyesight of premature babies born in areas where ophthalmologists are in short supply.

The study looked at telemedicine exams used to diagnose retina problems associated with premature birth, or retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a disease that in the past caused blindness among most premature victims.

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Shots - Health News
6:07 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Stressed Out: Americans Tell Us About Stress In Their Lives

Aly Hurt/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:57 am

Everyone seems to talk about feeling stressed out. But what's the reality of stress in America these days?

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find out.

Our questions zeroed in on the effect of stress in Americans' lives. We asked about people's personal experiences with stress in the preceding month and year. We also asked about how they perceived the effects of stress, how they cope with stress and their attitudes about it.

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Shots - Health News
2:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

For Many Americans, Stress Takes A Toll On Health And Family

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Stress is part of the human condition, unavoidable and even necessary to a degree. But too much stress can be toxic — even disabling.

And there's a lot of toxic stress out there.

A national poll done by NPR with our partners at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that more than 1 in every 4 Americans say they had a great deal of stress in the previous month.

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