Health

DALLAS — A Harris County resident has contracted the first human case of the West Nile virus in Texas this year.

Harris County Public Health & Environmental Services confirmed the case Thursday. Doctors for the unidentified man, who is hospitalized, expect him to recover.

In Dallas County, health officials have confirmed Texas’ first mosquito trap testing positive for the West Nile virus this year. Dallas-area media outlets report the trap was collected from the city of Mesquite.

Source: NAMI

AUSTIN — The Texas House has preliminarily approved a proposal offering to help repay student loans for psychiatrists who provide care in underserved parts of the state.

Passed Thursday 89-52, the bill provides help repaying student loans for medical personnel who work in “designated mental health professional shortage areas.”

Those qualifying would also have to treat Medicaid patients, low-income children or people confined to some state-run correctional facilities. The Senate passed the bill last month. It now needs only a final House vote to be sent to Gov. Greg Abbott to be signed into law.

According to a recent state report, fewer than 2,000 licensed psychiatrists were offering direct care in Texas as of September 2013.

Nearly 3,000 delegates from around the world are gathering this week in one of the most expensive cities in Europe to debate the fate of the World Health Organization.

There's one main question on the table: Will the WHO be given the power and money it needs to be the world's leading health agency, or will it plod forward in its current state — as a weak, bureaucratic agency of the U.N. known more for providing advice than taking action.

Almost half the states now require doctors to tell women if they have dense breasts because they're at higher risk of breast cancer, and those cancers are harder to find. But not all women with dense breasts have the same risks, a study says.

Those differences need to be taken into account when figuring out each woman's risk of breast cancer, the study says, and also weighed against other factors, including family history, age and ethnicity.

Flickr user @doug88888 / cc

Both the Texas Senate and House of Representatives have passed legislation that would loosen restrictions on terminal patients accessing experimental drugs that aren't approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If signed into affect by Gov. Abbott the law would make  Texas the 17th state to approve such measures. 

What could the law change mean for the terminally ill in Texas? Will this affect scientific research?

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