Health

When James Harrison was 14, he got really sick. One of his lungs had to be removed, and he needed a lot of blood.

"I was in the hospital for three months and I had 100 stitches," he recalls.

After receiving 13 units — almost 2 gallons — of donated blood, Harrison knew right away that he wanted to give back.

"I was always looking forward to donating, right from the operation, because I don't know how many people it took to save my life," he says. "I never met them, didn't know them."

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All the rain that fell in May has helped the mosquito population explode in San Antonio. The City is doing what it can to help control the problem.

The San Antonio Metro Health District provides pest control services on public property for mosquitoes to protect people from diseases that these organisms can spread. Vector Control uses source reduction techniques and pesticides as necessary to control mosquitoes on public property by eliminating the breeding source, applying pesticides to stagnant water.

More than 1,300 people in South Korea are under mandatory quarantine as health officials scramble to contain the largest outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, outside the Arabian Peninsula. So far, at least 30 people in South Korea have contracted the virus, which has no known vaccine or cure. Two of them have died since the outbreak began May 20.

DALLAS — A Harris County resident has contracted the first human case of the West Nile virus in Texas this year.

Harris County Public Health & Environmental Services confirmed the case Thursday. Doctors for the unidentified man, who is hospitalized, expect him to recover.

In Dallas County, health officials have confirmed Texas’ first mosquito trap testing positive for the West Nile virus this year. Dallas-area media outlets report the trap was collected from the city of Mesquite.

Source: NAMI

AUSTIN — The Texas House has preliminarily approved a proposal offering to help repay student loans for psychiatrists who provide care in underserved parts of the state.

Passed Thursday 89-52, the bill provides help repaying student loans for medical personnel who work in “designated mental health professional shortage areas.”

Those qualifying would also have to treat Medicaid patients, low-income children or people confined to some state-run correctional facilities. The Senate passed the bill last month. It now needs only a final House vote to be sent to Gov. Greg Abbott to be signed into law.

According to a recent state report, fewer than 2,000 licensed psychiatrists were offering direct care in Texas as of September 2013.

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