Health Care

Flickr user Adam Fagen (afagen) / cc

Before the end of the month the U.S. Supreme Court will make several ruling that will directly impact Texas – one could upend the Fair Housing Act, another could make same sex marriage legal and another could basically end the Affordable Care Act in Texas by ruling that the Federal government can’t provide health insurance subsidies to states that didn’t set up their own ACA exchanges.

Federal officials have spent years locked in a secret legal battle with UnitedHealth Group, the nation's biggest Medicare Advantage insurer, after a government audit detected widespread overbilling at one of the company's health plans, newly released records show.

Online health insurance marketplaces are central parts of the Affordable Care Act. And HealthCare.gov, the federally run exchange, is where 27-year-old Kathryn Ryan, a restaurant server in Philadelphia, turned for health coverage, as soon as the law took effect.

"I was excited because if it weren't for Obamacare, I wouldn't be insured at all," she says. "I wouldn't have the ability to go to the doctor."

She can afford health insurance thanks to a $200 a month subsidy that brings her premium down to $60 a month.

More than 1,300 people in South Korea are under mandatory quarantine as health officials scramble to contain the largest outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, outside the Arabian Peninsula. So far, at least 30 people in South Korea have contracted the virus, which has no known vaccine or cure. Two of them have died since the outbreak began May 20.

Source: Teladoc

DALLAS — A federal judge has determined claims made by the Texas Medical Board in adopting new telemedicine rules were “suspect” and barred the rules from taking effect until a civil trial can be held in lower court.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Robert Pitman hinges largely on a revised rule the board adopted in April that requires a patient to have a “face-to-face visit or in-person evaluation” before a prescription can be dispensed. The board has argued such a measure is crucial to ensuring patient safety and quality care.

But Dallas-based Teladoc, which challenged the board’s action, argued the panel violated federal antitrust laws because the rule significantly impairs its business model.

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