Health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beating the drum again: We're consuming too much sodium and it's a reason we have such high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Not me, you say? Well, chances are, yes, you.

No one predicted the Ebola epidemic before it burst forth in 2014 and continued to claim lives throughout 2015. And so, as 2016 begins, readers might well wonder what biological culprits — parasites, bacteria and viruses — are lurking out there, ready to unleash another outbreak of something terrible on an unsuspecting world.

We put the question to four infectious disease experts: What are your best educated guesses about the big global health stories in 2016?

My 3-year-old drinks milk, but not very much of it, and that could be a problem for her.

We live in the Northeast, where the sun's rays are weaker. And now that the days are shorter, my kid arrives at day care a few hours after sunrise and leaves when it's dark. That all made me wonder whether she's getting enough vitamin D, and if not, what we should be doing about it.

Shelby Knowles / The Texas Tribune

AUSTIN — Domingo Martinez, 42, was crossing East Riverside Drive when a vehicle struck and killed him on Nov. 8. Police said the driver did not stop to provide aid. 

Bethany Clark, 20, was crossing Howard Lane when a city bus fatally collided with her as it made a right turn on Sept. 14.

San Antonio resident Candace Stark had never heard of Chagas Disease until she was told she had it.

“About July 2013, I went to donate blood. About six months later I got a letter with the lab report showing I had the antibodies,” she said.

The next problem for Candace was finding a doctor who knew how to deal with Chagas.

“The first one didn’t know much about it himself and sent me to a second one, and he was having to read up on it out of the books,” she said.

Doctors are now playing catch up.

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