Health

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Both the Texas Senate and House of Representatives have passed legislation that would loosen restrictions on terminal patients accessing experimental drugs that aren't approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If signed into affect by Gov. Abbott the law would make  Texas the 17th state to approve such measures. 

What could the law change mean for the terminally ill in Texas? Will this affect scientific research?

Guest:

We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people wh have already experienced such an event or are at extremely high risk.

AUSTIN — The Texas House has preliminarily approved requiring high school athletes to undergo electrocardiogram testing for possible degenerative heart problems before participating in campus sports.

Representatives voted 86-57 Monday to make EKG testing mandatory as part of physicals taken to participate in all University Interscholastic League activities.

They did so while Scott Stephens — whose son Cody was a high school football player but died in 2012 of sudden cardiac arrest just before graduating — watched from the gallery.

http://bit.ly/1NWL7EI

That diet soda you thought was helping you lose weight might be doing the opposite, according to a new study from the University of Texas Health Science Center.

After examining 749 adults across the city, the San Antonio Longitudinal Study on Aging, a study that has spanned multiple decades, found that consumption of diet soda was linked with increases in waistlines in senior citizens.

From Texas Standard:

It wasn't too long ago when Dallas became the epicenter for what many feared could have been the beginning of a nationwide ebola epidemic. Since then, the U.S. government has fought to figure out when and where the next viral epidemic may come from.

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