Julie Ledet, Witte Museum

Just in time for summer exploring, there’s a new exhibit at the Witte Museum called the H-E-B Body Adventure powered by University Health System.

Curator of Archeology and Health Bryan Bayles calls it a “brand new, four-story, indoor-outdoor interactive experience that’s all about health IQ, empowerment and wellness.”

While that sounds a bit nerdy and wonkish, the actuality is anything but. During my visit I saw dozens of children going from exhibit to exhibit, interacting as they were supposed to, and very likely, learning all the while.

Michel Marizco / Fronteras

Last week the Texas Department of State Health Services toured U.S. Customs and Border Patrol facilities where thousands of unaccompanied children from Central America are living.

While the department has no jurisdiction over the Fort Brown Detention Center in Brownsville and the McAllen Station Detention Center, DSHS Media Relations Director Carrie Williams said they have been able to provide technical assistance and vaccines.

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

The increase in immigrants, especially unaccompanied children, on the border has the feds calling for increased aid to violent countries and increased enforcement. The state of Texas has authorized up to $1.3 million per week to stem the tide.

Is enough attention being paid to humanitarian efforts rather than simply stopping the flow of immigrants?

As more and more foreign born make it through, is their a looming public health problem as the unvaccinated are held in detention facilities on the border and those that weren’t caught make it into communities?


An Iowa man who was sentenced to 25 years for not disclosing to a sexual partner his HIV-positive status had his sentence vacated last week.  

Nick Rhoades, who was 26 years old at the time, used a condom, was actively taking anti-viral drugs, and didn't transmit the disease to anyone, but the crime of criminal transmission of HIV in Iowa and many other states doesn't require you actually transmit.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Senior citizens and families who need some cool air this summer are receiving help from Project Cool, an effort to distribute box fans throughout San Antonio.

As the summer months begin, San Antonians are looking for ways to beat the heat. Project Cool began 19 years ago between Catholic Charities, the San Antonio Fire Department, St. Vincent de Paul and other organizations. Catholic Charities President Antonio Fernandez said as the program kicks off, 20-inch box fans are needed.