Health

Almost half the states now require doctors to tell women if they have dense breasts because they're at higher risk of breast cancer, and those cancers are harder to find. But not all women with dense breasts have the same risks, a study says.

Those differences need to be taken into account when figuring out each woman's risk of breast cancer, the study says, and also weighed against other factors, including family history, age and ethnicity.

Just a few months ago McDonald's was showing no love for kale.

In a TV ad promoting the beefiness of the Big Mac, the chain poked fun at the leafy green and other vegetarian fare: "You can't get juiciness like this from soy or quinoa," a low voice quips as the camera focuses on a juicy burger. "Nor will it ever be kale."

But the chain is now showing it some affection. McDonald's has announced that it's testing a new breakfast bowl that blends kale and spinach with turkey sausage and egg whites. McDonald's spokeswoman Lisa McComb says the bowls are "freshly prepared."

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NEW YORK — Among Hispanic groups in the United States, Puerto Ricans appear to have the worst health, according to a government report released Tuesday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued its most comprehensive report on Hispanic health, drawing from earlier research. But it also offered new details on differences among Hispanic populations in the U.S. About 1 in 6 Americans is Hispanic.

Among the findings:

— Puerto Ricans have higher rates of cancer and heart disease than Mexican-Americans, Cuban-Americans, or those with roots in Central or South America.

— Compared to Mexican-Americans and Cuban-Americans, Puerto Ricans have the highest death rates from cancer, heart disease, homicide and five other leading causes.

— Hispanics, as a whole, have a substantially lower cigarette smoking rate than whites. But the Puerto Rican smoking rate is the highest among Hispanics, and as high as the national average.

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Both the Texas Senate and House of Representatives have passed legislation that would loosen restrictions on terminal patients accessing experimental drugs that aren't approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If signed into affect by Gov. Abbott the law would make  Texas the 17th state to approve such measures. 

What could the law change mean for the terminally ill in Texas? Will this affect scientific research?

Guest:

We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people wh have already experienced such an event or are at extremely high risk.

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