Hispanic

LOS ANGELES — Researchers say a rising percentage of Hispanics in the United States speak proficient English and the share of those speaking Spanish at home has been declining.

A Pew Research Center report released Tuesday says 68 percent of Hispanics spoke only English or spoke English very well in 2013, up from 59 percent in 2000.

The report says the share of Hispanics who speak Spanish at home dropped to 73 percent from 78 percent over the same period.

The shift comes as migration to the United States from Latin America has slowed.

dvsross / cc

NEW YORK — Among Hispanic groups in the United States, Puerto Ricans appear to have the worst health, according to a government report released Tuesday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued its most comprehensive report on Hispanic health, drawing from earlier research. But it also offered new details on differences among Hispanic populations in the U.S. About 1 in 6 Americans is Hispanic.

Among the findings:

— Puerto Ricans have higher rates of cancer and heart disease than Mexican-Americans, Cuban-Americans, or those with roots in Central or South America.

— Compared to Mexican-Americans and Cuban-Americans, Puerto Ricans have the highest death rates from cancer, heart disease, homicide and five other leading causes.

— Hispanics, as a whole, have a substantially lower cigarette smoking rate than whites. But the Puerto Rican smoking rate is the highest among Hispanics, and as high as the national average.

Survey: Nearly 9 In 10 US Adults Now Have Health Insurance

Apr 13, 2015
Ryan Poppe

WASHINGTON — Underlining a change across the nation, nearly 9 out of 10 adults now say they have health insurance, according to an extensive survey released Monday. As recently as 2013, slightly more than 8 out of 10 had coverage.

Whether the new number from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index turns out to be a high-water mark for President Barack Obama’s health care law, or a milestone on the path toward his goal of getting virtually all U.S. residents covered, remains to be seen.

The law’s future is still up in the air, and will turn on factors ranging from an upcoming Supreme Court decision on consumer subsidies to actions by Republican leaders in states opposed to Medicaid expansion.

The Gallup-Healthways survey found that the share of adults who lack insurance dropped to 11.9 percent for the first three months of this year, the lowest level since that survey began its tracking in 2008.

Marco Rubio, the charismatic, Hispanic, young (and even younger-looking) freshman senator from Florida is launching his campaign for the White House Monday in Miami.

Rubio, 43, will be entering a growing field of candidates. Right now, he's considered a second-tier candidate, polling behind Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the man Rubio has called a mentor.

That could change once he gets in. Rubio's advisers believe he has a path to the nomination, with assets few other candidates can match.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

-- It’s been more than four years since President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act. More than 11 million people have signed up for health insurance, but there are still Latinos in Texas who are uninsured.

-- In New Mexico, another healthcare dilemma — a behavioral health provider will end its programs just two years after opening, leaving many criminal offenders without services.

Pages