Jan Ross Piedad/Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Housing Authority unanimously chose David Nisivoccia to be its new president and CEO in December 2016. While he has been leading SAHA in an interim capacity since March 2015,  the position as head of the state's largest public housing authority is now secured.

From Texas Standard:

Texas Public Radio news director Shelley Kofler  has spent the past week on the impacts of population growth. TPR staff visited Fredericksburg and Bexar County, as well as middle-income and historic neighborhoods in San Antonio. She shared with the Standard some of the newsroom conversations she and her staff had that led to the "Growing Pains" series.

"A lot of this started just with us sharing our personal experiences in the newsroom," Kofler says. "And then we checked it out, and we looked at the data, and we said 'We have some real serious challenges here.'"


Virginia Alvino / Texas Public Radio News

The Alamo City is known for preserving historic sites like the San Antonio Missions. But there are also 27 designated historic neighborhoods where the desire to preserve is being challenged by the development of new condos and townhomes. 

This week our Growing Pains project is looking at how population growth and the economy are affecting housing.  For this report we visited one San Antonio neighborhood where development is bringing some welcome improvements but threatening tradition and raising taxes.   


The median price of a home in the San Antonio area went up 7 percent last year to $192,600. 

In its annual housing market forecast on Thursday, the San Antonio Board of Realtors (SABOR) also said the competition for homes was so strong houses only remained on the market for an average of 59 days.

Shakira Crawford, a single mother in New York City, struggles to find a landlord who will accept her city voucher to pay rent.

For more on this report, visit WNYC's "The Long Way Home" series page.