Hurricane Harvey

Credit National Weather Service

Continuing coverage of Hurricane Harvey, its effects on Texas, and the local, state, and national response to the storm.

Harvey made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane on Friday, August 25, 2017 near Rockport, Texas. It then moved inland, skirting San Antonio but causing major flooding in the Houston area.

Ryan Poppe

Vice President Mike Pence, on his second trip to Texas this month, praised Republican governors like Texas Gov. Greg Abbott for state initiatives that he said were the building blocks behind much of what the White House was trying to accomplish with tax and healthcare plans.

Hurricane Harvey was the worst flood in Houston's history. Scientists and citizens are still piecing together why it was so bad, but it's becoming clear that a lot of the damage comes down to how people have built America's fourth-largest city.

You can see the problem from your car. Houston is a sprawling web of strip malls and 10-lane freeways.

From Texas Standard:

Gov. Greg Abbott was in Washington on Tuesday, seeking additional federal funding for Harvey relief and getting an earful from Texas' congressional delegation – a group he called "spineless" a few weeks ago when he felt they weren't working hard enough to bring home the bacon.

Many residents in Houston are still trying to get back on their feet two months after Hurricane Harvey. That includes Alma Roberts, whose home of 14 years flooded for the third time during Harvey in southwest Houston. She had flood insurance, but getting help to start over is taking time.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti talks with Roberts about how her family is holding up.

From Texas Standard.

During Hurricane Harvey, the Army Corps of Engineers decided to open the floodgates to release water from the Addicks and Barker Reservoirs. Thousands of downstream properties flooded. Now, many of those affected are suing to recoup damages from that flood.

They’re arguing that the government essentially took their property without permission when they released water from the dams.

L.M. Sixel, a business reporter with the Houston Chronicle, says it’s turning into quite the frenzy for lawyers of all stripes.

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