Immigration

Ryan E. Poppe

 The U.S. Supreme Court this morning has agreed to hear arguments in a Texas-led lawsuit challenging President Obama’s executive action that aimed to expand “deferred action” on immigration.   In response to the high court’s decision to hear merits of the case, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said, “In deciding to hear this case, the Supreme Court recognizes the importance of the separation of powers.

John Burnett / NPR

Government Raids And Deports Central American Families

Federal immigration agents have initiated a controversial roundup of Central American families who were part of the border surge that began in 2014.

They are mainly young mothers with children whose asylum claims have been rejected. The Homeland Security Department says 121 have been picked up out of more than 100,000 immigrants who crossed the border illegally.

At a shelter home in East Austin, the raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, have terrified immigrants here who lost their cases and await deportation.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement last weekend began a targeted deportation of Central Americans who are in the country illegally. That includes families in Texas.

Thousands of Central American women and children fleeing violence have been released from family detention centers in the last 18 months. But there aren't enough community and legal services to help them make their cases for asylum. 

That’s according to Johnathan Ryan, executive director of the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, RAICES.

Back in 2012, President Obama took executive action to create a program for unauthorized immigrants who entered the U.S. as children before June of 2007, and who are currently younger than 34.

That program has come to be known as DACA — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — and since it was instituted, it has temporarily protected almost 700,000 people from deportation.

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