Latino vote

Ryan E. Poppe

Casting his ballot ahead of Tuesday’s election, Republican Gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott remains confident about his chances amongst likely Hispanic voters. Abbott predicts his campaign will win a majority of votes throughout the Rio Grande Valley.

The lines for early voting were longer than in 2010, including for the Republican candidate for governor, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, who waited to cast a ballot for himself before the last day of early voting. 

Ahead of the midterm elections, Michel Martin is visiting Charlotte, N.C., to learn more about Latino voters' growing influence in the state. Join Michel for a Facebook chat from 4:30-5 p.m. ET today as she answers questions and shares more on her reporting.

David Martin Davies

Monday was the deadline to register to vote in Texas. And the state’s larger county election offices are reporting a two percent increase in voter registration. That's interesting, because this is a non-presidential year election, which typically generates less enthusiasm. Some are taking that as a sign that the group Battleground Texas is making headway in changing voting patterns in Texas. Battleground Texas is led by veterans of the Obama presidential campaigns and is aligned with Wendy Davis. So is Texas getting ready to show on blue on election day?

When New Mexico Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gary King told the crowd at the Democratic Party of Valencia County annual fundraiser on Sept. 6 that Republican Gov. Susana Martinez "does not have a Latino heart," he was reportedly paraphrasing previous remarks made by famous labor icon and native New Mexican Dolores Huerta. King probably meant to say that Gov.

A big deal has been made about the Republican Party's so-called Hispanic problem during recent U.S. election cycles. But there's another group — largely white and male — that has also struggled to increase the number of Latinos in its ranks: America's religiously unaffiliated. Until recently, that is.

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