Remember Katie? She is the woman from Delaware who is thinking about getting married, but her boyfriend doesn't want her to take his last name. "He was strongly against it," she wrote. "He doesn't want an obviously Latino surname (think: Lopez or Garcia) to affect me negatively."

Ask Luis Garza how the La Raza exhibition came to be at The Autry Museum of the American West, and he raises his palms, eyes heavenward:

"Karma," he says. "Fate. Serendipity. The gods have chosen to align us at this moment in time."

Mexican-American country star Rick Trevino brings his Texas guitar and his take on this Latino moment in America.

In an attempt to reach a younger and more diverse audience, the largest and most well-known Latino advocacy group in the U.S., the National Council of La Raza, renamed itself this month. The new name, UnidosUS, was announced at the group's 2017 conference in Phoenix. This has caused a rift in the U.S. Latino community — some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind.

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At a glance, Volcán appears to be a band straight out of a Latin American country, maybe Venezuela or Cuba. So much so that many of the band members are often caught in a guessing game of what country they originate from, especially lead singer Jose Huizar. Which rich vocals and an impeccable Latin accent, Jose fills the room with his presence and takes you to another world, far from Texas.