Leticia Van de Putte

Two Democrats in the Texas House quickly announced their intention to run for the Senate seat being vacated by San Antonio State Sen. Leticia Van De Putte; both Trey Martinez-Fischer, and his party rival, Jose Menendez, said they were the best lawmakers for the job.

Both Martinez-Fischer and Menendez have had their toe on the starting line for many months now, waiting to see what became of Van De Putte’s run for Lt. Governor, and her bid for mayor, just recently announced. 

Texas Public Radio

Last night State Senator Leticia Van de Putte announced her candidacy for San Antonio mayor. Van de Putte's entrance comes after an unsuccessful run for Lieutenant Governor earlier this month. The move made her the second declared candidate for mayor with former State Representative Mike Villarreal. 

Both candidates have been active in San Antonio politics for years and their entrance into the field may convince current city council members. 

Ryan E. Poppe

As San Antonio Democratic state senator, Leticia Van De Putte, considers her next career move, other firebrand Democratic lawmakers have already begun announcing their interest in filling her spot in the state senate. 

Sen. Van De Putte says she isn’t sure whether she’ll run in the San Antonio mayoral election in 2015, but it might be interesting to note how this potential move might affect senate Democrats during the upcoming legislative session.

Texas politics is about to take another big step to the right. While nobody outside Texas would describe Gov. Rick Perry or Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst as moderate Republicans, their likely replacements are considerably more conservative — especially in the powerful lieutenant governor's office.

The eyes watching Texas have mostly focused on the governor's race between Wendy Davis and Greg Abbott. But the contest between former conservative radio talk show host Dan Patrick and state Sen. Leticia Van de Putte from San Antonio will very likely be of more political consequence.

Ryan E. Poppe / TPR News

   

State lawmakers took issue with the Texas Education Agency’s plan to keep the standard for writing component of the Texas STAARS exam at a lower level for a third year in a row. Lawmakers voiced concerns with keeping the lower standard and changing the exam while student performance  remains flat.

The state introduced the STAAR exams in 2011 and because of failing test grades the legislature reduced the number of exams from 15 to five in 2013.  

State Sen. Leticia Van De Putte, D-San Antonio, said the STAAR exam may have run its course. 

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