local music

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio’s music industry generates an estimated $930 million in economic impact, according to a city study that came out last year.

UTSA professor Stan Renard saw that report, which drew data from music venues, bars, music education organizations and nonprofits, and said something was missing.

Oscar Moreno

San Antonio's music industry contributes an estimated $930 million to the local economy, according to a recent study mandated by the City of San Antonio. 


Frank Guerrero

A San Antonio band is getting some noteworthy statewide recognition. 


Norma Martinez

Sunny Ozuna is an icon of Tejano music.  Not only has he been making music since his high school days in the 1950s, but he’s an artist whose discography goes on for days. The 74-year-old San Antonio native has a new album that is a retrospective of his oldies R&B hits of the '60s and early '70s.  It’s called Mr. Brown Eyed Soul.  Texas Public Radio's Norma Martinez recently had a chance to talk with "El Cancionero" about the new album and a reflection on his life and career.

In the late 1950s, as a 15-year-old student out of San Antonio's Burbank High School, Ildefonso Fraga Ozuna had dreams of becoming a singing sensation. First, though, he needed a catchier stage name and settled on Sunny Ozuna. Fittingly, his band would become known as the Sunliners; together, Sunny & The Sunliners would become mainstays in what is now known as "the westside sound."

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