local music

Call it San Antonio's West Side Sound, Chicano Soul, West Side Soul, doo-wop with horns, whatever you call it, San Antonio was the site of a musical mash up, a cultural clash and sound synthesis that is resonating decades after its 60s and mid-70s creation. 

Bands like "Sonny Ace & The Twisters," "Rudy Tee & The Reno Bops," "Little Henry & and The Laveers," are just a few of the bands that made up a very popular but highly localized scene. Jason Longoria, owner of El Westside Sound System says the music is still with us.

Doo-wop harmonies, lovelorn lyrics and soulful horns came together to form a fresh sound in the early ‘60s to mid ‘70s on San Antonio’s west side. Described by Fresh Air as being “among the least-known music scenes ever to thrive in America,” the sound was truly multiracial and multicultural.

From Texas Standard:

Music is undergoing a transformation – chances are you've not only heard of Spotify and Pandora, you're a subscriber too. The vinyl of old is long gone.

At clubs and bars, the DJs – most of them are men – typically work fake turntables controlling mp3 files. That's just the way its done today.

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Talking to members of the San Antonio six-piece band fishermen, it’s clear the guys aren’t fooling around. Of all the groups that came to our studios this summer for our “Back 40” live music project, they’re the only ones that brought their manager along. That they even have a manager is also telling.

“When did we not need a manager?” jokes bass player Roy Scavone.