local music

Norma Martinez

Sunny Ozuna is an icon of Tejano music.  Not only has he been making music since his high school days in the 1950s, but he’s an artist whose discography goes on for days. The 74-year-old San Antonio native has a new album that is a retrospective of his oldies R&B hits of the '60s and early '70s.  It’s called Mr. Brown Eyed Soul.  Texas Public Radio's Norma Martinez recently had a chance to talk with "El Cancionero" about the new album and a reflection on his life and career.

In the late 1950s, as a 15-year-old student out of San Antonio's Burbank High School, Ildefonso Fraga Ozuna had dreams of becoming a singing sensation. First, though, he needed a catchier stage name and settled on Sunny Ozuna. Fittingly, his band would become known as the Sunliners; together, Sunny & The Sunliners would become mainstays in what is now known as "the westside sound."

It might seem strange that a bunch of San Antonio Tech names -- Graham Weston, Lew Moorman, Dirk Elmendorf, etc -- are fronting the money for a new music festival. But Botánica Music Festival Co-founder David Heard says they see it as celebrating San Antonio as well as investing in millennial talent.

He recounted a story where he recently tried to recruit a 22-year-old tech worker from Atlanta.

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In an era where anyone can with a Macbook can produce music, Tera Ferna shows us the importance of an honest-to-goodness, flesh-and-blood band. With their “soul rock” style and brotherly bonds, the band merges four highly distinctly individuals into one fresh and smooth-running musical machine.

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Jed Craddock, A.K.A The Unusuals has created his own kind of “intelligent pop.” Blending uplifting lyrics with electronic instruments and guitar, Craddock emanates John Mayer but adds his own kind of modern twist. 

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