mariachi

Norma Martinez

If you’ve ever eaten at a Mexican restaurant or attended a Mexican wedding — or other celebratory occasion — you’ve probably encountered a band of mariachis.

Now, mariachi music has expanded beyond the usual haunts. Mariachi programs have blossomed in schools nationwide in the last couple of decades.


Erik Anderson

This week on Fronteras:

  • In California, Border Patrol agents are getting sick from sewage spills in the Tijuana River.
  • A language barrier often exists between patients and their doctors  (7.02).
  • A high profile Hispanic throws her hat into the ring for Texas governor (12.57).
  • Mariachi music makes its way out of the cantinas and into the classrooms (17.27).


Al Rendon

An event will be held Wednesday at a San Antonio club known for jazz. But the music performed there that night, decidedly won't be.

 

Courtesy photo

Since its opening last year, Jazz, TX hasn’t limited itself to its namesake musical style. Folk, rock, blues, and even classical musicians have taken the stage at the cozy spot beneath the Pearl’s new food hall. One audience favorite over the past year has been Mariachi Las Coronelas, an all-female ensemble led by Vanessa del Fierro.

The fastest-growing Mariachi music program outside of Mexico is in Wenatchee, a town in central Washington state where kids of Mexican descent are trying to stay connected with their roots.

Northwest News Network’s Emily Schwing (@EmilySchwing) visited Wenatchee’s award-winning high school mariachi band.

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