medical research

US National Institute of Health NIAID http://bit.ly/1IUW8JA

President Obama announced in his State of the Union Address, and followed up with details in late January, a $215 million plan to better design drugs and therapies to work on individual patients rather than average ones.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base," and this is the second installment of the ongoing series.

It was 2005, and Gary Walters had served a year in Iraq. Then, one day, a bomb went off near him, and he suffered severe wounds.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the latest in the ongoing series.

"There's been more advancement in the field of prosthetics since 1945 than there has been in the entire automobile industry," says Mark Vukov, a clinical education manager at College Park Industries, a manufacturer of prosthetic feet.

Eileen Pace

 

The U-T Health Science Center at San Antonio has been selected to participate in a multi-level, national research program to explore non-medication options for chronic pain.

The $21 million dollar program seeks to demonstrate the efficacy of alternatives for pain management that can help combat the overuse of prescription opioids.

There’s plenty of evidence of the need for alternatives to pain meds.

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine [CAM], which is funding the studies, calls it an “urgent public health imperative.”

UT Health Science Center

Today, Monday, July 28, is World Hepatitis Day and a local researcher has published a paper about a cure for Hepatitis C that he says is different and more available than a previous cure announced earlier this year.

The World Hepatitis Day website has a fun little diddy with hand puppets singing about the very serious disease. The song says viral hepatitis kills 1.5 million people around the world each year, the same number that die from HIV and AIDS.

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