Mexico

From Texas Standard:

Earlier this month a group of Mexican reporters received Spanish-speaking media's highest journalistic honor for an investigation that uncovered uncomfortable truths about Mexico’s university system. Long considered pillars of integrity in a country rife with corruption, investigative reporters revealed that some of those most respected universities were part of an organized money laundering system. About $400 million (U.S.) taxpayer were siphoned into phantom businesses. Now, nearly half that money can't be accounted for.

Mexico's ambassador to the United States, Gerónimo Gutiérrez, says that the Mexican government has been working to "manage migration flows" — despite President Trump's tweets accusing the country of doing "very little, if not NOTHING," to stop crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Gutiérrez says that a caravan of U.S.-bound Central American migrants, also the target of the president's ire in recent days, is reducing in numbers and likely to wrap up soon.

In the sunny colonial city of Oaxaca, Mexico, diners at the upscale restaurant Los Danzantes might notice their fellow patrons drinking a brown, carbonated soda. It looks like Coca-Cola and it tastes — almost — like Coca-Cola. But Coca-Cola it is not.

It's a drink called Zega-Cola, an all-natural substitute to the ubiquitous soft drink. It's made in the nearby village Santa Ana Zegache, and these days, many Oaxacans are clamoring for it. Its creator, a carpenter named Antonio Ambrosio Salvador, sold more Zega-Cola last month than in his entire first year of production.

Roberta Jacobson, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico, has handed in her resignation. The career diplomat, with more than 30 years in government service, says it was a difficult decision to leave.

Jacobson, 57, is the latest in a string of high-level diplomats to depart the State Department since President Trump took office.

In a note to embassy staff, Jacobson said, "The decision is all the more difficult because of my profound belief in the importance of the U.S.–Mexico relationship and knowledge that it is at a crucial moment."

From Texas Standard.

As of now, about half a million people have registered to vote in July’s  presidential election in Mexican, and there are a few things you should probably know about the way our neighbor to the south conducts its elections.  For one, this year, Mexicans will elect the first cohort of politicians that will be eligible to be reelected.

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