Mexico

The Two-Way
8:59 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Mexico Officially Declares 43 Missing Students Dead

A relative holding a picture of one of the missing students, wipes a tear from her face during a press conference in Mexico, City.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Mexico's attorney general made it official last night: The 43 college students who went missing last fall are dead.

That's the conclusion they've reached based on confessions of the alleged perpetrators and forensic evidence.

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Fronteras
3:13 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

Journalists In Mexico Trying To Harness The Power Of The Public Following Student Murders

Franciso Munoz prepares to deliver a midday newscast.
Lorne Matalon

On Fronteras:

-- People in Mexico are tired of government corruption, violence, and of not feeling safe. Mexicans are protesting in ways they haven’t and some journalists are also getting bolder. Get this story from Marfa Public Radio’s Fronteras reporter, Lorne Matalon.

-- Some Republicans are trying to change or repeal the Texas Dream Act this legislative session. The Act allows certain undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at colleges in the state.

-- We bring you a story about how art is helping refugees in Houston define and share their experiences.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Wed January 14, 2015

Mexico Charges Former Iguala Mayor In Missing Students Case

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 3:00 pm

Mexico's office of the attorney general made two announcements of note Wednesday in regard to the case of the 43 missing students.

Tomas Zeron, director of criminal investigations at the office, said that they had obtained another arrest warrant against former Iguala Mayor José Luis Abarca Velázquez in connection with the kidnapping of the 43 students. And he also said that Velázquez's wife, María de los Ángeles Pineda Villa, had been linked to the Guerreros Unidos organized crime group.

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Parallels
9:22 am
Sun December 14, 2014

Survivor Of Mexican Student Attacks Tells Of Bullet-Riddled Escape

Flowers, candles and handwritten messages remembering the 43 missing students line the fence at the National Palace in Zocalo, Mexico City.
Geovien So Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Sun December 14, 2014 11:18 am

In Mexico, authorities continue the investigation into the kidnapping and presumed murder of 43 students from a college in the southern state of Guerrero.

On a recent afternoon at the teaching school in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, I spoke to one man who says he survived the attacks on Sept. 26. NPR couldn't independently confirm 22-year-old Carlos Martinez's account, but it is consistent with other eyewitness versions and investigator's statements.

We spoke in the school's outdoor patio that doubles as a basketball court, but no one has been playing since the attack.

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The Salt
3:54 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Mexican Megafarms Supplying U.S. Market Are Rife With Labor Abuses

At the end of the day, Roma tomatoes are ready for transport in Cristo Rey in the state of Sinaloa. Half the tomatoes consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico.
Don Bartletti Los Angeles Times

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 8:06 pm

"Product of Mexico" — it's a label you see on fruit and vegetable stickers in supermarkets across the U.S.

It's also the name of an investigative series appearing this week in the Los Angeles Times.

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The Two-Way
8:31 pm
Sat December 6, 2014

Remains Of 1 Of 43 Missing Mexican Students Identified

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 11:42 am

Remains of one of the 43 missing college students in Mexico have been identified, NPR's Mexico correspondent Carrie Kahn reports for our Newscast division.

DNA tests showed that bone fragments matched a student identified as Alexander Mora Venancio, 19, one of the students who went missing in September, allegedly kidnapped and murdered by a drug gang that was working with local police. The identification was announced on the Facebook page of the teaching school attended by the students, Kahn says, as well as by multiple media outlets.

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Parallels
4:01 pm
Mon December 1, 2014

Legal Pot In The U.S. May Be Undercutting Mexican Marijuana

Nabor, a small-scale marijuana grower in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinoloa, checks his plants. As legal pot increasingly becomes available in the U.S., Americans appear to be buying more that is grown domestically. Prices for marijuana from Mexico have fallen sharply.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Tue December 2, 2014 4:57 am

Made-in-America marijuana is on a roll. More than half the states have now voted to permit pot for recreational or medical use, most recently Oregon and Alaska. That number also includes the District of Columbia. As a result, Americans appear to be buying more domestic marijuana, which in turn is undercutting growers and cartels in Mexico.

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Parallels
4:22 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Two Men's Efforts To Help Migrants In Mexico End In Their Murders

Two years ago, Honduran Wilson Castro was one of countless migrants trying to make his way to the United States. He decided to stay in Mexico instead and help Adrian Rodriguez Garcia feed other migrants traveling through by train. The two men were murdered recently in Huehuetoca, Mexico.
Carrie Kahn

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 8:29 pm

This is the story of the murder of two aid workers in Mexico. The men fed Central American migrants traveling north through Mexico on a freight train that stopped near their home.

They were critical of both corrupt police, who abused and extorted the migrants, as well as the organized crime gangs that kidnapped and robbed them.

It wasn't hard to find the two men — they were never far from the train tracks — but there were no witnesses to their deaths, and police won't comment about the case. The double homicide didn't even get a mention in the local press.

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Latin America
4:53 pm
Sat November 22, 2014

Still Few Answers In Killing Of 43 Students In Mexico

Originally published on Sat November 22, 2014 6:06 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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Mexico
1:51 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Anger, Protests Grow Over Mexico's 43 Missing Students

A students takes part in a protest by students of the Ayotzinapa school and parents of the 43 missing students in Acapulco on November 19, 2014. A caravan of students and relatives of the missing students, feared to have been massacred, came to Acapulco as part of its journey to the Mexican capital to end November 20. (Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 1:34 pm

Today is a day of protest across Mexico, and in other cities around the world, for the 43 university students missing for nearly two months.

In Mexico, the protests and the anger have been growing for days over the government’s handling of the disappearance and presumed murder of the 43 students. The protesters’ rallying cry: “Ya me canse” or “ya me canse del miedo” — I’ve had enough, I’ve had enough fear.

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