Mexico

Lorne Matalon

On Fronteras:

-- People in Mexico are tired of government corruption, violence, and of not feeling safe. Mexicans are protesting in ways they haven’t and some journalists are also getting bolder. Get this story from Marfa Public Radio’s Fronteras reporter, Lorne Matalon.

-- Some Republicans are trying to change or repeal the Texas Dream Act this legislative session. The Act allows certain undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at colleges in the state.

-- We bring you a story about how art is helping refugees in Houston define and share their experiences.

Mexico's office of the attorney general made two announcements of note Wednesday in regard to the case of the 43 missing students.

Tomas Zeron, director of criminal investigations at the office, said that they had obtained another arrest warrant against former Iguala Mayor José Luis Abarca Velázquez in connection with the kidnapping of the 43 students. And he also said that Velázquez's wife, María de los Ángeles Pineda Villa, had been linked to the Guerreros Unidos organized crime group.

In Mexico, authorities continue the investigation into the kidnapping and presumed murder of 43 students from a college in the southern state of Guerrero.

On a recent afternoon at the teaching school in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, I spoke to one man who says he survived the attacks on Sept. 26. NPR couldn't independently confirm 22-year-old Carlos Martinez's account, but it is consistent with other eyewitness versions and investigator's statements.

We spoke in the school's outdoor patio that doubles as a basketball court, but no one has been playing since the attack.

"Product of Mexico" — it's a label you see on fruit and vegetable stickers in supermarkets across the U.S.

It's also the name of an investigative series appearing this week in the Los Angeles Times.

Remains of one of the 43 missing college students in Mexico have been identified, NPR's Mexico correspondent Carrie Kahn reports for our Newscast division.

DNA tests showed that bone fragments matched a student identified as Alexander Mora Venancio, 19, one of the students who went missing in September, allegedly kidnapped and murdered by a drug gang that was working with local police. The identification was announced on the Facebook page of the teaching school attended by the students, Kahn says, as well as by multiple media outlets.

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