Mexico

Fronteras Desk
2:33 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Deportation Protests Continue As Immigration Reform Prospects Wane

Demonstrators danced into the late afternoon in front of the ICE office in Phoenix under a banner they hung themselves on the front gate.
Jude Joffe-Block Fronteras

Fronteras: Activists are calling on President Obama to take administrative action to stop deportations as the chance of Congress passing a reform bill this year wanes. Hundreds of vulnerable towns in New Mexico are trying to avoid running out of water during this drought. We’ll hear about the challenges foreign doctors face when they come to the U.S. Also, a report on an award by the Hopi Foundation in Arizona for people who work with victims of torture to help them heal.

Read more
Fronteras Desk
11:54 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Barrio Battles Big Industry For Environmental Justice

Shipbuilding industry at the water's edge in Barrio Logan.
Guillermo Sevilla

Fronteras: The low income San Diego neighborhood of Barrio Logan, which is closely linked to the shipbuilding industry, has been largely ignored by the city until residents fought maritime industry for a new community plan, and won. Under the Affordable Care Act, Native Americans are exempt from the mandate that requires citizens to get health insurance, but that hasn’t stopped New Mexico from trying to get consumers covered. Also, how the drought has forced some Native farmers to consider non- traditional irrigation methods and a rarely used desalting plant in Yuma could start sending water to Mexico.

Read more
The Source - Septemnber 25, 2013
2:03 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

The Source: Addiction Treatment Providers Feel The Squeeze | How PEMEX Reform Could Affect Texas

Greg Zaragoza for Texas Public Radio

In the first segment:

Addiction has an economic impact of $559 billion per year in the US, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse -- here in Bexar County it is $1.7 billion.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:27 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Death Toll Near 100, And Likely To Rise, From Storms In Mexico

A car lays buried in mud after flooding triggered by Hurricane Manuel in Chilpancingo, Mexico.
Alejandrino Gonzalez AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 8:45 am

Authorities were saying early Friday that at least 97 people were known to have died in the flooding, mudslides and other deadly after-effects of the two storms that struck the country this week.

Torrential rains and then-Hurricane Manuel lashed the west coast of Mexico, particularly in around Acapulco. Hurricane Ingrid pummeled the east side of the nation, along the Gulf Coast.

Read more
Culture
6:23 am
Sat September 7, 2013

In Macho Mexico's Lucha Libre, The 'Lady' Is Often The Champ

Pasión Kristal walks toward the ring in Magdalena Culhuacán, Mexico.
Daniela Herrerías for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 7:56 pm

Read more
Latin America
1:58 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Pena Nieto Encourages Mexicans To Embrace Change

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto presents his first annual report to the nation during a ceremony before the Congress at his presidential residence in Mexico City on Monday.
Omar Torres AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:23 pm

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto says his nation is undergoing a major change — one his country should not fear. Pena Nieto gave an upbeat assessment of his nine-month-old administration in his first State of the Union address on Monday.

Despite his positive review of Mexico's condition, the new president is dealing with chaotic protests in the capital, intractable levels of violence and a less favorable economic outlook than predicted.

He campaigned on the promise of creating a modern and prosperous Mexico. And according to his appraisal, he's done just that.

Read more
Fronteras Desk
11:18 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Tensions Rising In Texas-Mexico Water Dispute

The Francisco I. Madero Dam outside Delicias, Chihuahua overflowed after four days of record rain in late July. This water will eventually flow downstream to the Rio Grande River.
Mónica Ortiz Uribe Fronteras

Fronteras: Farmers in South Texas are angry with Mexico, part of a water dispute that’s fueling tensions between the two nations. Dubbed the "anti-Arizona" bill, California’s TRUST Act is moving toward passage. A closer look at that train that derailed in Mexico. Also, the influence of Asian immigrants has brought new flavors to Las Vegas tacos.

Read more
Fronteras Desk
11:42 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Immigrant Families With Mixed Legal Status In Limbo

Cynthia Alba, 19, is working legally in the United States for the first time after receiving deferred action last year. She said the possibility that immigration reform will stall once again, and her deferred action work permit will expire, terrifies her.
Heath Haussamen

Fronteras: Excessive alcohol consumption cost United States taxpayers more than $220 billion in 2006. Several hundred people living on the banks of the Tijuana river canal were evicted. What are they planning to do now? Immigrant families in the U.S. with mixed status wonder about the fate of immigration reform now that Congress is in recess. One of Mexico’s most isolated indigenous groups is fighting logging in old-growth forests. Also, hear how a civil rights giant is now a comic book hero.

Read more
Fronteras Desk
11:26 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Arizona's Outdoor Tent City Jail Turns 20

Tent City has become a symbol of Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s law enforcement regime.
Jude Joffe-Block Fronteras

Fronteras: How environmental concerns stack up against border security as Congress considers adding more fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border. This weekend marks the 20th anniversary of the outdoor jail that has become a symbol of the law enforcement style of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio. The Hopi Nation in northern Arizona is in the middle of what advocates call a domestic violence epidemic. Also, why the chilies in your favorite hot sauce may give you more of a kick than you bargained for.

Read more
Health News
2:22 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Border Town Women Turn To Mexico For Abortion Pill

Pharmacy in Matamoros. Women seek misoprostol here, hoping to end a pregnancy.
David Martin Davies

Texans are learning to live with a new anti-abortion law, which will shut down 37 of the state’s 42 abortion clinics. The law bans abortion after 20 weeks, requires abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, restricts the use of the abortion drug RU-486 and requires clinics meet the standards of ambulatory surgical centers. 

For the border region of the Rio Grande Valley, this means women will have little choice but to turn to dangerous alternatives to deal with an unwanted pregnancy.

Read more

Pages