New Braunfels

New Braunfels Utilities

A jury in Comal County has found in favor of New Braunfels Utilities in a lawsuit against the Lower Colorado River Authority.

The verdict could mean a nearly $30 million judgment against the LCRA for violating its contract with the local utility.

In returning the verdict in favor of NBU, the jury found that LCRA had breached its 1974 Wholesale Power Agreement with the utility and violated state law by charging excessive and discriminatory rates.

Alamo Area MPO

The Alamo Area Metropolitan Planning Organization is working this week with residents in its expanded metro area outside San Antonio to come up with a regional transportation and traffic safety plan for the next 25 years.

John Masterson

Mid-Texas Symphony has a performance on Sunday that may have escaped your attention, but I'm here to make sure it doesn’t!

“We are in Seguin, and we perform in Seguin and New Braunfels," said Mid-Texas Symphony Music Director David Mairs. "I think it’s been said that they are the two smallest cities in the United States that have a fully paid, fully professional orchestra. We are founded by Anita Windecker, a former piano professor at Texas Lutheran University.”

The Mid-Texas Symphony uses musicians from all around Seguin, but as Mairs explained, they don’t stop there.

San Antonio-Bexar County MPO

The San Antonio-Bexar County Metropolitan Planning Organization is in the midst of its second round of public meetings to plan for the next 25 years of regional transportation needs.

With new census numbers bringing in large populations from surrounding areas, regional road planning is necessary to accommodate all the expected traffic growth from an additional 1.5 million residents by 2040. 

Flickr user Jeff Gunn / cc

The New Braunfels ordinance that bans cans and large coolers on the Comal and Guadalupe Rivers was overturned by a state judge.

The New Braunfels City Council banned cans; other disposable items, and large coolers from its rivers in 2011. Met with opposition from river outfitters, a group sued the city shortly after the council vote. A judge has indicated he will rule in favor of those outfitters.

James Ewbank, the attorney for the river outfitters, said the can ban was arbitrary: