Race

Code Switch
11:48 pm
Wed December 17, 2014

An Updated 'Annie' And The Tradition Of Nontraditional Casting

Quvenzhane Wallis (second from right) stars in an updated version of Annie, produced by Jay Z.
Barry Wetcher Sony Pictures Entertainment

Originally published on Wed December 17, 2014 8:07 pm

That lovable moppet with the red dress, the curly hair, the big dog, and the even bigger voice is back.

This time, though, Little Orphan Annie is back with a difference: Quvenzhane Wallis is playing an African-American orphan in an ethnically diverse, up-to-date world. And that got us thinking about other instances where producers have breathed fresh life into familiar shows by making them dance to a new beat.

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Parallels
6:49 am
Sun November 9, 2014

In Brazil, Race Is A Matter Of Life And Violent Death

Residents look on as Brazilian military police officers patrol Mare, one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 30. In one of the world's most violent countries, homicide rates are dropping — but only for whites.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 9, 2014 11:13 am

On June 11 — one day before the World Cup started — two policemen picked up three black teenagers in Rio de Janeiro. The three hadn't committed any crime — but they did have a history of petty offenses.

The officers drove them up to the wooded hills above the city. One was shot in the head and killed. One was shot in the leg and the back and left for dead. Another escaped.

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Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Sat October 25, 2014

'Ole Miss' Debates Campus Traditions With Confederate Roots

Mississippi Rebels fans cheer for their team prior to their game on October 18. The University of Mississippi has been in an ongoing effort to distance the state's flagship academic institution from its segregationist history.
Michael Chang Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 5:54 pm

University of Mississippi football is riding high these days; they're undefeated and one of the top three teams in the nation.

But as Ole Miss fans come together to root for their team, many other traditions are coming under scrutiny. The school's been engaged in a long-running effort to remove potentially divisive, and racially charged symbols, to try and make the campus more "welcoming."

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:59 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Six Words: 'Must We Forget Our Confederate Ancestors?'

Waverly Adcock, a sergeant and founder of the West Augusta Guard, prepares his company for inspection and battle at a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia. Sara Smith, whose great-great-grandfather was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, holds the Confederate battle flag.
Courtesy of Jesse Dukes

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 7:55 am

NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

Jesse Dukes does not have Confederate ancestors. But in the time he has spent writing about Civil War re-enactors, he has met many who say they do.

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Code Switch
4:23 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

'A Chosen Exile': Black People Passing In White America

Dr. Albert Johnston passed in order to practice medicine. After living as leading citizens in Keene, N.H., the Johnstons revealed their true racial identity, and became national news.
Historical Society of Cheshire County

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 1:24 pm

Several years ago, Stanford historian Allyson Hobbs was talking with a favorite aunt, who was also the family storyteller. Hobbs learned that she had a distant cousin whom she'd never met nor heard of.

Which is exactly the way the cousin wanted it.

Hobbs' cousin had been living as white, far away in California, since she'd graduated from high school. This was at the insistence of her mother.

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Code Switch
11:23 am
Thu August 14, 2014

Roundtable: The Past And Present Of 'Yellowface'

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 1:55 pm

Every few months, there's a renewed discussion about "yellowface" — when people wear makeup or clothes in an attempt to look more Asian. In just the past year, the subject has come up in conversations about How I Met Your Mother, The Mikado, Magic in the Moonlight and a performance by Katy Perry. (And now, HBO's show Jonah from Tonga is sparking a similar discussion on "brownface.")

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Education
11:52 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

A Push For Ethnic Studies In Texas Schools

Tony Diaz is a professor at Lone Star College and also an activist with the group Librotraficante. He helped lead a campaign to get the Texas Board of Education to endorse Mexican-American and other ethnic studies courses. (Laura Isensee/Houston Public Media)

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 2:20 pm

Ever since the civil rights movement in the 1960s, many educators, students and activists have pushed for more ethnic studies in public schools.

In 1968 at a San Francisco State University, students led the longest student strike in the country’s history calling for ethnic studies programs that accurately represented the student body and their needs. The student strike led to the establishment of the first school of ethnic studies in higher education.

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Code Switch
5:53 am
Mon June 30, 2014

'Do The Right Thing' Celebrates Its 25th Anniversary

Spike Lee directed, wrote and starred in "Do the Right Thing." The landmark film prompted a national conversation about racial tension.
Universal The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 3:22 pm

Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing was hotly anticipated when it was released 25 years ago.

The film about racial tension reaches a boiling point on a scorching summer day in Brooklyn. All the action takes place on one block in Bedford-Stuyvesant, one of the poorest neighborhoods in New York City; a block where African-Americans and Puerto Ricans live, Koreans and Italians work and the New York Police Department plays dirty.

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Code Switch
9:54 am
Mon June 16, 2014

On The Census, Who Checks 'Hispanic,' Who Checks 'White,' And Why

The word "Hispanic" means very different things in different parts of the country, Julie Dowling says.
blackwaterimages Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 8:51 am

We've been talking a lot lately about how who fills out the Census in what way. It's an ongoing preoccupation of Code Switch, and one shared by Julie Dowling. Dowling, a University of Illinois sociologist, whose book, Mexican Americans and the Question of Race, came out earlier this year.

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The Source - June 10, 2014
11:41 am
Tue June 10, 2014

The Source: What Is White?

Irish people along with Italians were once thought of as inferior whites. This Thomas Nast image, entitled The Usual Irish Way of Doing Things and published in Harpers in 1871, depicts anti-Irish sentiments that were common at that time.

According to a presentation at the Population Association of America, and reported by the Pew Research Center, 1.2 million Latinos who identified as some other race in 2000 identified as white in 2010.

The finding came with an update on how millions of Americans changed how they identified their race and identity in the newest census and the Latino figure is raising some eyebrows, but should it?

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