retirement

Jesse K. Alwin / United States Marine Corp.

There’s no denying it: Texas is facing a shortage of physicians just as the state’s population ages, and an influx of retirees relocate to Texas.

Meanwhile, state lawmakers and the medical community are trying to figure out a solution to the growing problem.


"Army"
Judit Klein / Flickr

A nonprofit that tries to connect the military community with available resources released its 2017 Support Programming Survey Thursday.  

The Military Family Advisory Network surveyed 5,603 people with military ties, including active duty personnel, reservists, veterans and spouses, and found the financial strain of military life woven throughout the results.


About 1.7 million troops are eligible to switch from a traditional pension plan to a blended plan that works more like a 401(k). But some lack the financial skills to evaluate their options.

States and cities around the country are ramping up their efforts to attract military retirees, whose presence can be good for the local economy.

Many American workers find themselves financially unprepared for retirement. Among racial and ethnic groups, Latinos are the least prepared.

They're one of the fastest-growing racial or ethnic groups, and they have a longer life expectancy than whites and blacks — at about 81 years old.

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