same-sex marriage

Gage Skidmore / CC

NEW YORK — An owner of a gay-oriented New York City hotel lashed out at “extremists” who have urged a boycott over a dinner invitation to Sen. Ted Cruz, a vocal opponent of same-sex marriage.

But gay-rights advocates outraged by the invitation to the Republican presidential candidate say they will keep up the pressure by shunning all the properties owned by the men who hosted the dinner.

Hotelier Mati Weiderpass wrote in an op-ed piece in the New York Observer Sunday that since hosting the April 20 dinner he has been “inundated with hateful, biased social media messages, and attacks from gay extremists (do I dare say the word?) who demand inclusion, but do not believe in dialogue.”

“It is amazing that my businesses are being boycotted by some because I hosted a discussion with an elected official,” said Weiderpass, who owns The Out NYC in Manhattan's Hell’s Kitchen with Ian Reisner.

Ryan E. Poppe

Members of the Texas Senate have given preliminary approval to a bill that would protect religious leaders opposed to same-sex marriage.  The bill would give ministers the option of not performing wedding services, should the US Supreme Court strike down state bans on gay marriage.

The legislation by Wichita Falls Republican Sen. Craig Estes seeks to prevent any possibility that a minister in the state could be forced to marry a same-sex couple should the Supreme Court strike down state bans on the recognition of same-sex marriage.

Twitter

AUSTIN — Republican Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is publicly getting behind a religious objections bill that is moving fast after the U.S. Supreme Court heard historic arguments over gay marriage.

Abbott tweeted Wednesday that he hopes to receive a Republican-backed measure that would allow clergy members to refuse officiating marriages that violate their beliefs. That Abbott supports the bill isn’t surprising. But it marks the first time he has publicly backed one of a number of proposals that opponents consider anti-gay.

State senators are wrangling over a bill that would protect clergy who don’t want to perform same-sex marriages.

The author of the bill is Sen. Craig Estes, a Republican from Wichita Falls. He says some religious leaders in Texas oppose gay marriage. They’re waiting to see how the U.S. Supreme Court rules on the issue in June, and they want to make sure they won’t be legally required to marry same-sex couples.

Flickr user Fibonacci Blue / cc

AUSTIN — The national debate over religious objection laws roiled again Thursday in Texas, after Republican lawmakers abruptly pushed a new proposal on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court hearing historic arguments over gay marriage.

Even advocates for same-sex couples say the bill, aimed at allowing clergy members to refuse officiating marriages that violate their beliefs, largely duplicates protections that already exist.

However, the legislation drew attention because of its timing — weeks after filing deadlines had passed in the Texas Senate and on the same day the landmark gay marriage case was heard in Washington.

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