sculpture

Arts & Culture
4:40 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

A Unique Art Exhibit For The Blind At Mercury Project Gallery

A recently-blinded war vet experiencing The Color of Blind exhibit.
Katherine Brown

Imagine an art exhibition where what the art looks like isn’t that important.

"The Color of Blind is an interactive art show for the visually impaired," said Trina Bacon, the founder and curator of The Color of Blind.

“It’s a touch show where you can go and actually touch all the art pieces," she said. "The way the blind see is through touch.”

It's an odd concept to grasp, but once you make that leap -- realizing that the eyes aren’t playing a role -- it gives the concept of an art show a whole new meaning.

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Arts & Culture
10:02 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Convention Center's "Mustangs" Looking For A New Home

Mustangs at Noon
Mac Adams

If you've seen the five horses caught in mid-gallop on the east wall of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, you may be wondering where they have run off to.

The bad news: The east end of the convention center has been demolished, and Mustangs at Noon, the art piece that created the striking image, is gone. The good news: It's probably coming back. Somewhere, at some point.

“We had them professionally removed very carefully," said Public Art San Antonio Manager Jimmy LeFlor. "They’ve been set aside from all the demolition so they’re protected."

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Arts & Culture
12:07 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Robert Indiana's Love-Hate Experiences In San Antonio

Indiana's iconic Electric Love sculpture.
Morgan Art Foundation, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Robert Indiana was a successful artist in the 1960s, but shot to worldwide fame when he produced the Electric Love sculpture that became forever attached to the era. The McNay exhibition takes you beyond that work to his other creations -- from stage costumes, to sculpture to paintings.

“Working at the McNay I always enjoy going and seeing exhibitions before we open them to the public," said McNay Director of Communications Daniela Oliver. "This time around it really took my breath away.”

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Arts & Culture
12:09 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

McNay Exhibit Goes Beyond 'Electric LOVE' With Robert Indiana

The Electric LOVE, 1966/2000
Morgan Art Foundation, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Robert Indiana is one of America’s most successful living artists. I spoke to him recently from his island home off Maine. You probably know Indiana’s iconic Electric LOVE sculpture with the distinctive crooked "O" from the mid 1960s.

"I've done pretty well by being known for Love," reflects the artist.

But beyond the love statue there is so much more. Last week the McNay Art Museum opened Beyond Love last week at the expansive Stieren Center.

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Arts & Culture
12:54 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Experience The U.S.-Mexico Border At New Blue Star Exhibit

Broken Landscape III
Future Arts Research (F.A.R.), ASU, Phoenix, AZ

A new exhibit at the Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum is getting some heated interest and the reason is probably because if its subject mater, and size. It’s not exactly something you can hang on your wall.

"The sculpture at Blue Star is approximately 70 ft. long," said Blane de St. Croix, the artist who created the sculpture he calls Broken Landscape III.

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Arts & Culture
4:49 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

New St. Mary's University Sculpture Garden Features Works By "Brother Mel"

Sculpture by Brother Mel
Eileen Pace TPR News

Some of the Marianist Brothers from St. Mary’s University are headed out next month for a scavenger hunt of sorts -- to fill the school’s new sculpture garden -- and a particular art studio in St. Louis may have just what the school is looking for.

St. Mary’s is the oldest and largest Catholic university in Texas. Steeped in history and boasting excellent law and business programs, now the university is adding a sculpture garden to honor the memory of a beloved leader.

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Arts & Culture
4:54 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

See A Super-Long Accordion At Artpace's Localized Histories Exhibit

The Localized Histories exhibit at Artpace is open until December 29.
Todd Johnson

Open now at Artpace in the upstairs Hudson Showroom is the new exhibit Localized Histories. Artpace’s Deputy Director Mary Heathcott explains the collection's backstory.

"Most central to the exhibition is a work by Artpace’s founder, Linda Pace. Linda Pace worked with assemblage and found objects in her own artwork," she says.

From huge works taking an entire wall, to smaller ones using dimes, nickels and small balls, they’re all comprised of artist-found elements. Then there’s the piece in the center of the room.

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Arts & Culture
3:53 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

New Artpace Exhibit All About Connecting

Julia Barbosa Landlois' BURIED, NOT DEAD
Artpace staff

The large glass windows at Artpace’s 445 North Main facility features an unusual new exhibit, with legs ascending from sand piles in the floor, swirling towards the ceiling.

Artist Julia Barbosa Landois describes it:

"There are all these different legs," she says. " They start as these neutral, earthy colors, and they become very vibrant, purples, light blue, turquoise, pink. And then at the top they become reflective, embossed, colored foil."

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Arts & Culture
12:00 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

UIW Dedicates New Arts Building For Ceramics & Sculpture

UIW's Ruth Eilene Sullivan Ceramic and Sculpture Studio Dedication
Jack Morgan TPR News

As part of a larger strategy to build new arts facilities at the University of the Incarnate Word, a new ceramics and sculpture studio was dedicated Tuesday.

UIW President Louis Agnese explained at the unveiling how the Ruth Eilene Sullivan Ceramic and Sculpture Studio signals a renewed commitment to the arts.

"We wouldn't be spending $16 million at the corner of Broadway and Hildebrand on all of our programs on music and art if we were not focused on that area," Agnese said.

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Arts & Culture
11:06 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Makin' Hay Leaves Hardberger Park For Its New Home

Makin' Hay exhibit was popular with visitors to Phil Hardberger Park from March, 2011 to Sept., 2013.
Eileen Pace TPR News

The beloved "hay art" at Phil Hardberger Park is going away, but that doesn't mean they will be left with nothing. Art lovers will have something new to celebrate starting this weekend.

Makin’ Hay depicts giant human-like characters stacked up to 17 feet tall, made of steel and bales of hay, involved in various activities. Parks Project Manager Sandy Jenkins said the art is being removed this week and being taken to its home in Bentonville, Ark.

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