Sheryl Sculley

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

The proposed city budget for FY 2015 places more emphasis on services like street maintenance than in years past, all the while talks are stalling in the saga over police and fire health benefits.

Joey Palacios / TPR News

One of San Antonio's most familiar faces will be stepping down from his role at this end of this year.

William McManus will resign from his position as police chief in December to take a job with CPS Energy as senior director of security starting in January.

City Manager Sheryl Sculley hired McManus as police chief eight and a half years ago and was one of her first appointments as city manager. Since McManus isn't from the area, Sculley said him wanting to stay local speaks volumes about the Alamo City.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

A marathon city council meeting Thursday yielded a myriad of actions that San Antonio City leaders took on various issues.

Likely the biggest item of the day was the vote on the closure of a block of Main Avenue so that HEB can expand its headquarters at the Arsenal, and construct a downtown grocery store and gas station.

Charlotte Luongo and many others expressed to the council their longtime opposition of the project.

"This whole process is suspect and demonstrates a lack of democracy and respect to the citizens of San Antonio," Luongo said.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

In the first segment:

As city leaders looked at a $50 million shortfall the City of San Antonio's draft budget, cuts to library hours and park maintenance were on the table. The ad valorem tax on property, where the city raises much of its funds, has remained flat since 2009 while property valuations have resulted in more money for city coffers.

Community organizations protested and city councilors responded.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

In a news conference following the City Council meeting where City Manager Sheryl Sculley presented next year’s proposed budget, she summed up the process in three words: Tough budget year.

Sculley and her team found $13.5 million in cuts, mostly administrative, but that doesn’t make up for the $35 million -$50 million gap the city is facing. Other measures and cuts will have to be made.

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