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The NPR Ed Team is all about great teaching — so how could we attend the annual SXSW education conference and not ask folks to tell us about their favorite teachers?

Thirty Years On, ‘The Breakfast Club’ Lives On At SXSW

Mar 16, 2015

AUSTIN — Ensuring film-lovers won't forget about them, actresses Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy reminisced about making The Breakfast Club at a screening of the fully restored 1985 film on Monday.

To kick-off the South by Southwest film festival screening, which commemorated the film’s 30th anniversary, the Barton Hills Choir serenaded attendees with their own rendition of the movie’s theme song, the Simple Minds’ Don't You (Forget About Me).

The audience at the Paramount Theatre — which was greeted with a table stacked with glazed doughnuts — sang along with the children’s choir, and then enthusiastically welcomed Ringwald and Sheedy to the stage for a question-and-answer session.

Sheedy, who now volunteers as a teacher at LaGuardia High School for the Performing Arts, said the movie’s message was a loving one. “You do matter, we are interested in you, and we’re going to tell your story,” she said, adding that she was a bit lonely after production wrapped.

The film chronicles five teens subjected to spend Saturday in detention at the fictional Shermer High School in Illinois.

Thousands have gathered in Austin for the annual South by Southwest Festival, which includes interactive, music and video performances and presentations. 

Over the weekend, the festival highlighted nearly two-dozen short films from Texas high school students. The short films could be no more than five minutes long, and four of them came from San Antonio students.

Ross Brothers

If you’re looking for talking heads in Bill and Turner Ross’s documentaries, you won’t find them. Their documentaries capture the essence of the people and places they film, from nocturnal New Orleans to a small Ohio town. Their latest portrait, Western, was shot in Eagle Pass and Piedras Negras, Mexico. The Ross brothers were there as the twin communities, united in one culture, slowly fractured from encroaching border violence and the construction of the border fence.