tacos

Tacos are delicious, and here is the place you can find all of TPR and NPR's coverage on the amazing culinary invention.

Norma Martinez

Ordering a taco in San Antonio might not land you the same results if you order one in Brownsville, or El Paso. 

A recent forum explored the different regionalities of Mexican food across Texas, and its cultural implications. Texas Public Radio’s Norma Martinez has more.

During the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, observers fast daily from dawn to dusk. And over the past few weeks, some observers in Southern California have been breaking that fast with tacos.

In his address to Congress last week, President Trump said this about the kinds of people his immigration agents are singling out for deportation:

"We are removing gang members, drug dealers and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our very innocent citizens. Bad ones are going out as I speak."

Then why, some Houstonians are asking, did immigration agents target Piro Garcia, the owner of two popular taco trucks on the city's Southside?

It's a tough job, but somebody has to do it. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Mike Sutter, food critic for the San Antonio Express-News, about his "365 days of Tacos" series, in which he eats at a different taco joint every day for a year. He's done it before, in Austin, where he ate more than 1,600 tacos in 2015. But now he's moved to San Antonio, and he's finding that the taco scene there is a bit different, and in fact is tied to a cultural identity that spans back many decades.

If you've never laid eyes on a dogfish — or tasted one — you're not alone.

Yep, it's in the shark family. (See those telltale fins?) And fisherman Jamie Eldredge is now making a living catching dogfish off the shores of Cape Cod, Mass.

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