Texas History

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a bucket list of things you should do in the Lone Star state before you kick the bucket.

Pack your bags, fuel up your car, and come take a tour with us across the state …

Ryan E. Poppe

At the corner of Market and Laredo Streets in downtown San Antonio, tourists follow the arrows on a sign that points to internationally known tourist attractions, including the Alamo. There’s also a lone arrow pointing in the opposite direction, one that fewer follow. It directs visitors to the home of a Mexican who helped write Texas’ first constitution.

Many people know that during World War II, the United States created a system of internment camps for resident aliens from Japan as well as American citizens of Japanese descent.

However, what’s not generally known is that some Germans and Italians were targeted as well. They, too, were put into camps. Some of them were deported.

David Martin Davies

Two weeks ago Texas Matters aired a special report on the 1910 Slocum Massacre. It told the story of a murderous attack on an East Texas African American community and how Texas history has overlooked the event.

courtesy Institute of Texan Cultures

They’re a part of the American West that doesn’t get a lot of attention, but maybe it’s high time they did.  They were called the Buffalo Soldiers, and the Institute of Texan Cultures wants you to know about them.

“Buffalo Soldiers after the Civil War became very prevalent in West Texas as it led up into the Indian Wars.”

Greg Garret’s an Education Specialist with the Institute.

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