Aides to Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller say Miller has no plans to apologize for a post on a campaign Facebook account this past weekend that appeared to advocate the atomic bombing of “the Muslim world.” The post has since been deleted. The commissioner, who is on a trade mission to China, also has no plans to figure out which staffer shared the post.

From Texas Standard:

The highly publicized shootings of Michael BrownSam Dubose and several other African-American men has shined a spotlight on how the criminal justice system interacts with men of color. But with Sandra Bland’s recent death in the Waller County Jail, some are now asking how that same justice system treats women of color.

On the cover of the largest African-American-owned paper in the City of Houston — The Houston Forward Times — the headline reads, “The New ‘Jane’ Crow: Black Women Are The Target For Mass Incarceration.” Jeffrey Boney is the author of that article, and he lays out some pretty staggering statistics on African-American women being involved with the criminal justice system:

  • 1 in 100 African American women are in prison.
  • African-American women are seven times more likely to be incarcerated than White women.

Commuters in Houston are getting their first look some major changes to the city’s transit system today. It’s all part of an effort to attract more riders with more frequent and reliable service. But, will it work? Gail Delaughter from Here & Now contributor Houston Public Media reports.

From Texas Standard:

Jim Stever could show you an original letter from Sam Houston to someone at the Battle of San Jacinto.

For almost 35 years, the 90-year-old World War II veteran has been collecting letters written during the days of the Republic of Texas. 

From Texas Standard:

Seventy years ago this week, the United States dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Mike Cox is an author and award-winning journalist, he writes that Texas’ Padre Island was on the short list for testing the bomb.

On how close Padre Island was to becoming a test site:

“South Padre Island was one of eight sites that the U.S. Military considered as a place to explode the first atomic bomb. And it actually came down to about three sites that were pretty high on the list: one was in California, one was the Alamagordo site in New Mexico and the other one was South Padre Island — which, admittedly, at the time was pretty remote. But eventually they decided on blowing up that first device in New Mexico.”