textbooks

Ryan E. Poppe

It has been a long and contentious journey, one that ended rather anticlimactically on Friday. After receiving thousands of last minute corrections, the State Board of Education adopted all but one of the Texas 2015 social studies textbook submissions. The one not adopted, was because a publisher refused to compromise on the book’s content, and the board believed that content violated state policy.

For the most, however, textbook publishers were able to address both Republican and Democratic groups’ concerns about reportedly “biased” presentations of some content. 

Texas Hits The Books

Nov 21, 2014

In the education world, all eyes were on Texas Friday.

For the first time since 2002, the Texas State Board of Education voted to adopt a new generation of social studies products. That includes some 89 textbooks, workbooks and other classroom materials. The vote matters because, with about 5 million students, the state has a big impact on the national textbook market.

UN Conspiracies, Communism and the Common Core: These were just some of the critiques brought up during the final public hearing over the revisions and adoption of the state’s 2015 social studies textbooks. 

Conservative activists, and some on the State Board of Education, did not react positively to certain revisions made to a selection of social studies textbooks up for adoption this week.

Mary Lynn Gerstenschlager is a legislative liaison for the conservative Texas Eagle Forum. She testified before the state board on what she saw as a one-sided view of climate change.

Educators are calling for changes, but two of the nation’s largest academic publishers are holding firm on how climate science has been presented in textbooks set to be approved by the Texas State Board of Education next week. 

Flickr user Corey Seeman (cseeman) / cc

A national group of science educators is pointing to what they call inaccuracies and a political bias in the way that some publishers have presented the subject of climate change in Texas’ 2015 social studies textbooks.

The Texas State Board of Education hears public comment regarding that content today.

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