Transportation

Shelley Kofler / Texas Public Radio

As San Antonio prepares to add more than 1.6 million new residents it holds the distinction of being the largest city in the country without a rail system to move them. 

This week Texas Public Radio’s Growing Pains Project is looking at options in a series of stories we’re calling, “Stuck Behind the Wheel.”

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Here are a few facts guaranteed to get your attention:  

The San Antonio area adds 146 new residents every day, and they’re bringing their cars.

A 50 minute drive today is expected to take 91 minutes in 2040.  

By then, 39 percent of our roadways will be severely congested all day long.

This week Texas Public Radio’s “Growing Pains” project takes a look at options for getting ahead of the traffic jam,  with a series of reports, “Stuck Behind The Wheel.” We start by looking at how San Antonio’s primary form of mass transit could be part of the solution. 

When the Texas Highway Department was established in Texas in 1917 there were only about 200-thousand cars in Texas.

And those drivers only had fewer than a thousand miles of paved roads in the entire state.

Today the Texas Department of Transportation, TxDot, is responsible for more than 80,000 miles of state paved roads that accommodate more than 25 million vehicles.

A speeding bullet may be coming to San Antonio that will be able to transport you to Austin in 15 minutes. Transonic Transportation is working on the Hyperloop, a capsule like car that will run 600 mph, and only cost $10 to ride.

The Hyperloop is still ten years away. Cars like it are being planned in multiple cities, but none exist yet anywhere in the world. Josh Manriquez is the CEO of Transonic Transportation, a San Antonio-based company.

Sixty years ago today, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal Highway Act of 1956. It marked the birth of the interstate highway system, now a 47,000-mile network designed to ease crowded, crumbling roads in post-war America.

At the time, it was sold as one of the most ambitious public works projects ever, but six decades later, many interstates are overcrowded and under maintained. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with William Wilkins of The Road Information Program.

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