UT Health Science Center

USAF

  

The UT Health Science Center has established a special institute within the research center to integrate military and civilian studies for the benefit of members of the military as well as the local civilian community.

The Military Health Institute will lead innovative medical research, health education and clinical care – working with the military toward improving the health of active duty military personnel, veterans and their families.

Eileen Pace

 

The U-T Health Science Center at San Antonio has been selected to participate in a multi-level, national research program to explore non-medication options for chronic pain.

The $21 million dollar program seeks to demonstrate the efficacy of alternatives for pain management that can help combat the overuse of prescription opioids.

There’s plenty of evidence of the need for alternatives to pain meds.

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine [CAM], which is funding the studies, calls it an “urgent public health imperative.”

Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute, San Antonio / UTHSC

  

  Children’s cancer research in San Antonio is getting a boost from the National Cancer Institute.

A new infusion of $3.7 million is dedicated to helping an underserved population in South Texas.

South Central Texas is designated is one of 12 sites in the United States with the largest populations of underserved minority children.  

The Health Science Center’s Dr. Gail Tomlinson says Hispanic children have the highest incidence of cancers – and the poorest outcomes – and the South Texas population best represents the future demographics of the U.S.

Rosanne Fohn / UTHSC

Dramatic reductions in federal funding for medical research have been closing doors on some projects and narrowing the scope of others.

But even while funding has been declining, educators have been guiding more students toward STEM careers.

A State Department official said in San Antonio this week that young scientists will collaborate in new ways with other countries, provided they are guided to a broader education.

The UT Health Science Center maintains a strong arsenal of medical research and development, but president Dr. William Henrich says it’s a struggle.

A new study that uses stem cells to regenerate teeth is underway at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio. 

 The study is looking at restoring the life of a damaged tooth and bringing the practice to the forefront as the go-to treatment to replace standard root canals, which cause affected teeth to die. 

 Dr. Anibal Diogenes, assistant professor of endodontics at the UT Health Science Center, said children are at risk for serious problems with their teeth, especially the front teeth.

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