Midway through Matt Keil's second deployment in Iraq, he came home and married his fiancee, Tracy, in 2007.

He had two weeks R&R; no time for a honeymoon.

Before he went back to war the couple had the sort of conversation unique to newlyweds in the military. "I told her if you get a phone call that I'm injured, I'm probably fine," Matt says. "But if they come to the apartment or to your work in person, then I'm dead."

Virginia Alvino / Texas Public Radio News

The unemployment rate for veterans in the U.S. recently reached an all-time low - below five percent. But in Texas, that number is higher. A job fair was held Wednesday in the Military City specifically for service members and their spouses.

More than 80 employers tabled at the AT&T Center to recruit employees. These organizations from Starbucks to the Border Patrol, are looking specifically for veterans.

Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

"If I'm in the wrong, I'll admit it. But I'm not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA," he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

Jay Porter / U.S. Office of Personnel Management

The federal government has been steadily increasing the number of veterans it employs since President Obama issued an Executive Order in 2009 to do so. Yesterday, local veterans actively seeking federal employment gathered in San Antonio to learn about opportunities. 

When Anthony McCann opened a thick manila envelope from the Department of Veterans Affairs last year, he expected to find his own medical records inside.

Instead, he found over 250 pages of deeply revealing personal information on another veteran's mental health.

"It had everything about him, and I could have done anything with it," McCann said in an interview.