KPAC Blog

The KPAC Blog features classical music news and analysis.  From a detailed look at Wagner's masterpiece "Parsifal," to an inside look at the Latin Grammys, the KPAC Blog features writings about some of the music played on air as well as other interviews and essays about classical music.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:51 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Subterranean Notes, The New Baroque And A Nod To Minnesota: Music We Love Now

Violist Nadia Sirota.
Samantha West courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 10:52 am

From Christopher Purves' bottomless bass voice and the soaring Sibelius Fifth to a violist's new take on the Baroque, it's this week's list of albums we can't stop listening to. Got a favorite album you've had on repeat lately? Let us know about it the comments section.

Deceptive Cadence
11:23 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Classical Grammys 2013: Same Old Winners, Bold New Music

Members of eighth blackbird performing at the pre-telecast Grammy Awards Sunday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Ah, the joys of Monday morning quarterbacking, classical style.

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Arts & Culture
12:51 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

Soundtrack Review: "Argo"

Watertower Music

After five Academy Award nominations, composer Alexandre Desplat is one of the busiest musicians in Hollywood today. In 2012 alone, he scored six features and one short film, scoring another nomination this year for his work on Ben Affleck’s award-winning film, “Argo.”

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KPAC Blog: The Piano
12:52 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Making A Pianistic Point At The SAIPC

SAIPC

I've seen contestants in piano competitions play some large and impressive works when trying to stand out from their other competitors. Big and difficult works like Liszt's "b minor sonata" or Ravel's "Gaspard de la Nuit" are sure to get the judges attention, but there is also the fear of losing the audience.

It is not easy programming your first set at a competition. This week on The Piano, we visit more recordings from last October's San Antonio International Piano Competition.There are only two big and challenging works on the program.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:59 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Remembering Pioneering American Conductor, Poet And Anime Inspiration James DePreist

The late American conductor James DePreist.
Wendy Leher courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 1:31 pm

Pioneering American conductor, National Medal of Arts winner and poet James DePreist died early this morning in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 76 years old. His death, his manager told Deceptive Cadence, stemmed from complications following a heart attack he suffered nearly a year ago.

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Classical Spotlight
7:30 am
Fri February 8, 2013

YOSA And Children's Choir Re-Imagine Brahms

Conductor Troy Peters of YOSA
John Clare TPR

YOSA and CCSA collaborate for BrahmsFest

Monday night, February 11, two outstanding youth groups combine on the stage of Trinity University's Laurie Auditorium to celebrate the music of Johannes Brahms. The official Brahms Festival event will feature new orchestrations and old favorites.

Marguerite McCormick and Troy Peters will conduct the Children's Chorus of San Antonio and the Youth Orchestras of San Antonio Philharmonic in "Brahms ReImagined." 

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KPAC Blog: Metropolitan Opera
11:51 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Donizetti's Comedic Elixir For Love, 'L'Elisir d'Amore'

Anna Netrebko stars as Adina with Erwin Schrott as Dulcamara, the provider of the love-inducing elixir
Metropolitan Opera

After more than 180 years (1832), audiences are still laughing through their tears at Gaetano Donizetti’s comic masterwork, The Elixir of Love.

It is a commonplace to say that comedy is more difficult than tragedy, but what about an opera that walks that delicate boundary between the two?

Taking as a starting part the most common of themes -- provincial love and its difficulties -- Donizetti achieves something almost miraculous.

Opening Night in New York

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Classical Spotlight
6:56 am
Thu February 7, 2013

'Mona Lisa' Violin Smiles With New Owner Anne Akiko Meyers

Anne Akiko Meyers and her "ex-Vieuxtemps" Guarneri
Lisa Marie Mazzucco

Violinist Anne Akiko Meyers was recently named "Instrumentalist of the Year" by the Austin Critics' Table, and continues to tour around the globe (You may have met her at our 2010 CD signing party). Meyers typically tours with a 1730 Stradivarius violin called the "Royal Spanish" and a 1697 Stradivarius called the "Molitor," said to have been owned by Napoleon Bonaparte.

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Classical Spotlight
6:29 am
Wed February 6, 2013

The Five Browns Bring Their All-Piano Quintet To Boerne

The Five Browns
5 Browns

In classical circles, a piano quintet is almost always one piano and four instrumentalists (string or wind). The Five Browns are literally a piano quintet -- five Juilliard pianists -- and all family -- two brothers and three sisters! Since being dubbed the "Fab Five" by People Magazine, they have been featured on Oprah, 60 Minutes, Good Morning America, Today, and The Tonight Show.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:41 pm
Tue February 5, 2013

Lean But Seen: The Joy Of Smaller Opera

Composer Mohammed Fairouz, whose hour-long chamber opera Sumeida's Song recently appeared on recording and on stage.
Samantha West courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 8:50 am

When a new festival for opera and musical theater called "Prototype" opened in New York last month, it wasn't inaugurated with a huge new piece. Instead, the festival was kicked off with the first staging of Mohammed Fairouz' opera Sumeida's Song — a work for four singers and a handful of musicians that lasts just 60 minutes long, presented at Here, a theater in Manhattan's Tribeca that seats just 100 people.

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