This Week in the Civil War

The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes focusing on events from 1861 through 1865.  The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation.  Let us know what you think about "This Week in the Civil War."  E-mail your comments to Dr. John Huddleston at jhuddles@schreiner.edu.

Airs:  Weekdays at 5:19 a.m., 8:19 a.m., 4:19 p.m. on KTXI and 4:49 a.m., 9:29 p.m. on KSTX.

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Around the Nation
4:01 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

Picking Sides At Day Camp: Confederacy Or Union?

A small group of 8- to 12-year-olds learn about how soldiers trained for the Civil War.
Michael Tomsic WFAE

Originally published on Sun August 24, 2014 6:13 pm

During the Civil War, the red-brick building that now houses the Gaston County Museum in Dallas, N.C., served as a hotel. Now, 150 years later, 15 boys are milling in the lobby of the historic building, helping each other guess the famous names taped on their backs — names like Stonewall Jackson.

The guessing game is the first lesson of "Civil War Soldier Camp," a one-day program the museum has offered for 8- to 12-year olds for the past several years.

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Week of June 1- June 7
3:49 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #844

  At Cold Harbor, Virginia with Grant’s forces scarcely eight miles from Richmond, the Army of the Potomac frontally attacked Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia at 4:30 am on Friday, June 3, 1864.  In a headlong attempt to crush the Confederate line, a human wall of Union troops advanced.  In less than an hour, some 7000 Union troops were either killed or wounded in one of the bloodiest engagements of the Civil War.  By noon Grant called off his entire attack.  He would later proclaim that Cold Harbor was his greatest regret of the entire Civil War.  Grant’s critics would proclaim him a butche

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Week of June 1 - June 7
12:06 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #843

On June 1, 1864, Grant’s forces moved south to the Cold Harbor area of Virginia and found Confederate forces had once again beaten them into position.  For the next three days Union and Confederate forces maneuvered for position.  Despite the Union’s numerical superiority, Lee had received reinforcements from the Shenandoah Valley and southern Virginia; he used these troops well, entrenching his Army of Northern Virginia.  Grant intended to assault the Confederate line on June 2, but logistical problems forced a delay until the morning of June 3.  Knowing that many would die the next day i

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Week of May 25 - May 31
12:06 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #842

In November 1864 there would be a presidential election in the American North, and Lincoln’s emancipation policies and his lack of vindictiveness against the South caused many to oppose his re-nomination.  On May 31, 1864 at Cleveland, Ohio, a dissident group of Radical Republicans met and nominated General John C. Fremont for President and General John Cochrane of New York for Vice-President.

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Week of May 25 - May 31
12:06 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #841

As the fighting between Lee’s and Grant’s forces intensified in Virginia, it seemed to a concerned public that few areas of the American nation were immune from warfare.  In Georgia, Union forces successfully inflicted heavy losses on the Confederate units which attacked them near the town of Dallas.  However, in Missouri Confederate forces once again sacked Lamar, a town ravaged earlier in the war by the notorious paramilitary commander William Quantrill, and skirmished with Union forces at Warrensburg and Pleasant Hill.  Military action also occurred near Little Rock, Arkansas, Port Huds

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Week of May 25 - May 31
12:06 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #840

As the fighting between Lee’s and Grant’s forces intensified in Virginia, it seemed to a concerned public that few areas of the American nation were immune from warfare.  In Georgia, Union forces successfully inflicted heavy losses on the Confederate units which attacked them near the town of Dallas.  However, in Missouri Confederate forces once again sacked Lamar, a town ravaged earlier in the war by the notorious paramilitary commander William Quantrill, and skirmished with Union forces at Warrensburg and Pleasant Hill.  Military action also occurred near Little Rock, Arkansas, Port Huds

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Week of May 25 - May 31
12:06 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #839

In Virginia, Grant continued to attempt to turn Lee’s flank.  As Union cavalry occupied Hanovertown, south of the Pamunkey River, Lee moved back on shorter lines from his position near Hanover Junction, heading south and then eastward to confront Grant.  On May 27 and 28, 1864 cavalry skirmishing erupted at Hanover Junction, Sexton’s Station, Carmel Church, Dabney’s Ferry, Jones’ Farm, and numerous other places as Lee’s army once again moved in front of Grant’s forces, thus protecting the Confederate capital at Richmond.  Grant was as close to Richmond as McClellan had been in 1862, but on

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Week of May 25 - May 31
2:39 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #838

In mid-May 1864, following the Union defeat at New Market, Virginia, Ulysses Grant replaced General Franz Sigel with David Hunter and ordered his new Union commander to use scorched earth tactics against the inhabitants of the Shenandoah Valley.  While essentially “living off the land,” Hunter was to destroy as much property as he could and specifically target the Virginia Central Railroad which ran through the Valley.  On May 26 the South also assigned a new commander General W.E. Jones to the Shenandoah, replacing John C.

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Week of May 18 - May 24
12:50 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #837

In Georgia, after Joseph Johnston’s

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Week of May 18 - May 24
12:47 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #836

In Virginia, at the North Anna River Lee and Grant’s armies once again engaged in battle from May 23 through May 26, 1864.  On the 23rd as Grant began to cross the North Anna, Lee had the opportunity to attack a divided Federal army, but because of illness and other factors he did not seize the initiative.  By the 25th despite moving most of his army across the North Anna, Grant realized that Lee’s position, south of the river, was too strong for further assault.  So, on Thursday, May 26, Grant withdrew his forces across the North Anna and headed toward Hanovertown, once again maneuvering

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