This Week in the Civil War

The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes focusing on events from 1861 through 1865.  The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation.  Let us know what you think about "This Week in the Civil War."  E-mail your comments to Dr. John Huddleston at jhuddles@schreiner.edu.

Airs:  Weekdays at 5:19 a.m., 8:19 a.m., 4:19 p.m. on KTXI and 4:49 a.m., 9:29 p.m. on KSTX.

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld Texas’ refusal to issue a license plate bearing the Confederate battle flag, rejecting a free-speech challenge.

The court said in a 5-4 ruling that Texas can limit the content of license plates because they are state property and not the equivalent of bumper stickers.

The Sons of Confederate Veterans had sought a Texas plate bearing its logo with the battle flag. A state board rejected it over concerns that the license plate would offend many Texans.

Francis Biknell Carpenter http://bit.ly/1Bm2n6n

June 19, 1865 Union soldiers landed at Galveston to announce that the war had ended and slaves in the south were free. 

Since then 43 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the holiday of Juneteenth. It is the nation's preeminent celebration of the end of slavery, but many across the country have never heard of it and others hold it at arms length.

Should Juneteenth be a federally mandated holiday? Why is their resistance to it and how did it become the largest celebration of emancipation in the United States?

Guests:

This Week in the Civil War - #TY2

Jun 16, 2015

This is John Huddleston, the writer and creator of This Week in the Civil War. I want to thank the many professionals at Texas Public Radio for their kind support including Wayne Coble, Dan Skinner and especially my friend, Ruben Garcia for making me feel part of the Texas Public Radio family. and a big thank you from the bottom of my heart goes out to the many listeners of Texas Public Radio KTXI Kerrville-Fredericksburg-Ingram and KSTX San Antonio.

This Week in the Civil War - #TY1

Jun 15, 2015

This is John Huddleston. The writer, creator of This Week in the Civil War. Since March of 2011, its been my distinct pleasure to write vignettes on the American Civil War for Texas Public Radio. During that time, I’ve been blessed to work with professionals both at Schreiner University and at Texas Public Radio. I want especially to thank Dr. Timothy Summerlin, the President of Schreiner University, Dr. Charlie McCormick, Schreiner’s Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dr.

This Week in the Civil War - #1112

Jun 12, 2015

  Andrew Johnson, Tennessee Unionist, vice president, and president after Lincoln’s assassination favored a liberal Reconstruction policy after the war.  That placed Johnson on a collision course with the Radical Republicans who eventually impeached the president for dereliction of his duty.  In a Senate trial in May 1867, Johnson was narrowly acquitted.  Leaving the presidency in 1869, the former president returned to Tennessee until he was elected to the United States Senate in 1875.  Johnson returned to serve with many of the same men who had voted against him in his Senate trail.  In la

Pages