This Week in the Civil War

The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes focusing on events from 1861 through 1865.  The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation.  Let us know what you think about "This Week in the Civil War."  E-mail your comments to Dr. John Huddleston at jhuddles@schreiner.edu.

Airs:  Weekdays at 5:19 a.m., 8:19 a.m., 4:19 p.m. on KTXI and 4:49 a.m., 9:29 p.m. on KSTX.

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Week of November 30 to December 6
2:49 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #977

  On December 6, 1864, the same day that President Abraham Lincoln sent his annual address to be read in Congress, he named former Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase to become Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, succeeding the recently deceased Roger B. Taney.

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Week of November 30 to December 6
2:49 pm
Thu December 4, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #976

  On Tuesday, December 6, 1864 President Abraham Lincoln sent his annual, State of the Union, address to Congress where it was read to the members.  The president reported on the state of the Union war effort, noting that the national government’s finances were strong with the Treasury showing a balanced budget through July 1863 but requesting increased taxation.  Optimistic as he was, Lincoln cautioned “The war continues.”  Promising to pursue the war to ultimate victory, Lincoln noted, “I mean simply to say that the war will cease on the part of the government, whenever it shall have ceas

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Week of November 30 to December 6
2:49 pm
Wed December 3, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #975

  During Sherman’s march through Georgia, General Joseph Wheeler’s reinforced Confederate cavalry corps constituted the one and only effective threat to Sherman’s Union invaders.  In late November, on the 27th, Wheeler’s cavalry defeated in a two-day engagement at Waynesborough a force of Union cavalry under Hugh Kilpatrick, the leader of the abortive Union raid on Richmond earlier in 1864.  On Sunday, December 4, 1864 Wheeler once again attacked Kilpatrick’s cavalry which guarded Union troops at work destroying railroad tracks near Waynesborough.  An extended cavalry engagement ensued for

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Week of November 30 to December 6
2:49 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #974

  Even though his small, invading army had taken ghastly casualties at Franklin, John Bell Hood continued to follow his Union foe as they strategically withdrew into the defense lines of Union General George Thomas at Nashville, Tennessee.

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Week of November 30 to December 6
10:39 am
Mon December 1, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #973

  On Wednesday, November 30, 1864 at Franklin, Tennessee, the decisive battle between Hood’s Confederate invaders and Union forces occurred.   In the afternoon Hood launched a frontal attack against well entrenched Union forces which had arrived in Franklin first and had time to prepare for his assault.  Hood’s assault carried the forward Union positions, but his attack eventually failed as the battle continued well into the nighttime hours.  Five Confederate generals were killed on the field of battle, and one other was mortally wounded.  The attacking Confederates took in excess of 6250 c

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Week of November 23 to November 29
2:49 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #972

  During the Civil War citizens of the Colorado Territory felt that the Indians had taken advantage of a lack of Union troops in the West and had committed numerous atrocities against whites.  On Tuesday, November 29, 1864 900 Colorado militiamen under Colonel J. M.

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Week of November 23 to November 29
2:49 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #971

  While Sherman marched through Georgia, why didn’t his forces which faced token, Confederate opposition make an effort to march to Crawfordville, the home of Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens, or to liberate Andersonville, the prison where so many Union POWs were abused?  Stephens had become a bitter critic of Jefferson Davis by March 1864; perhaps Union officials saw advantage in not having Sherman’s troops visit and ravage Stephens’ property, even though it was in close proximity to where Sherman marched.  In the case of Andersonville, that prison was located much farther sou

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Week of November 23 to November 29
2:49 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #970

  On Friday, November 25, 1864 Confederate agents from Canada attempted a flamboyant, but poorly executed scheme to burn New York City.  An eight man team, calling themselves the Confederate Army of Manhattan, attempted to simultaneously set fires in nineteen hotels, a theatre, and at Barnum’s Museum.  None of the fires were successful, and the blaze at Barnum’s caused little more than temporary excitement.  With New York Copperheads failing to rise up in armed rebellion, the eight agents immediately escaped to Canada after their plan failed, and only Confederate R.C.

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Week of November 23 to November 29
2:49 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #969

  On Thursday, November 24, 1864, under the cover of darkness John Scofield’s Union force moved defensively northward from Pulaski, Tennessee toward Columbia.  Union troops under Jacob Cox, in the vanguard of Schofield’s force, arrived at Columbia, only to discover a skirmish taking place between Columbia based, Federal forces and elements of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry.  Cox quickly committed his troops and drove the Confederates from the field, insuring that the remainder of Scofield’s Union forces arrived at the important river crossing on the main road from Nash

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Week of November 23 to November 29
2:49 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #968

  On Wednesday, November 23, 1864 Union General Ulysses Grant and his staff traveled to Washington, D.C.

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