Nathan Cone

VP, Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media. His reporting and criticism has been honored by the Houston Press Club and Texas Associated Press.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Think Science: Humor

Aug 18, 2017

What makes you laugh? And why is it funny? Do you guffaw when Moe hits Curly over the head with a wrench, or is the witty, urbane comedy of Woody Allen or Whit Stillman more your style? And is there anything universally funny?

Kino Lorber

In 1928, the stock market crash was still a year away, and director William Wellman, coming off the success of World War I epic “Wings,” turned to the downtrodden for his next feature, “Beggars of Life.” Adapting his autobiography into a fictional story of lovers on the lam, Jim Tully provided Wellman with a grim look at America that was ahead of its time.

San Antonio Symphony

On Saturday, August 5, the San Antonio Symphony returns to the airwaves for a ten-week series of concerts featuring some of the orchestra’s best performances from the 2016-17 season. The programs, hosted by San Antonio’s Ricardo Chavira, air at 7 p.m. Saturdays as part of TPR’s ongoing “Performance Saturday” program featuring locally recorded classical music concerts.

The Organ As Orchestra

Jul 23, 2017
Nathan Cone / TPR

How do you take Tchaikovsky's “1812 Overture,” one of the biggest pieces of classical music ever written, and boil it down to one instrument? If that instrument is the organ, you’re a leg up, according to Tom Dooling, music director at First Presbyterian Church in downtown San Antonio.

“Because it’s such a tonally diverse instrument, you can replicate [the orchestra] in the organ,” Dooling says.

Pointing in the direction of organist Dr. Jae Ha, he adds, “the Tchaikovsky is one of many others he’s done, including the Beethoven 5.”

WASO Records

If you want to start a fight at a ragtime concert, start mucking with the tempo of the music. YouTube videos are full of comments about how fast or slow the pianist is playing any particular piece. The King of Ragtime, Scott Joplin, himself wrote “it is never right to play Ragtime fast.” But how fast is fast? There are piano roll recordings of Joplin himself clocking in the “Maple Leaf Rag” at around 100 beats per minute.

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