Nathan Cone

VP, Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media. His reporting and criticism has been honored by the Houston Press Club and Texas Associated Press.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy photo

How have The Four Freshmen managed to sound so young all these years? The voices come and go, but that beautiful four-part harmony remains the same.

“Well, we always like to use the analogy… it’s more like a sports team. The organization is the same, it’s just the players and the faces have changed throughout the years,” explains Bob Ferreira, the low (or 4th) voice in the group.

Courtey photo

Drummer Herlin Riley has been playing the drums since he was a toddler. The sound and feel of his native New Orleans is in his soul, and on the bandstand. “The rhythm of a particular area identifies the culture of the city, you know, whether it be [in] Cuba whether it be Jamaica, whether it be Africa. When you hear certain rhythms you can identify a certain culture. And so New Orleans is very, very strong in its culture.”

A decade ago, Hurricane Katrina threatened to wash away much of Riley’s native city.

Hilmy

Pianist Chris Villanueva’s quartet is joined by vocalist Jacqueline Sotelo for this week’s set on “Live At Jazz, TX.” Sotelo says of the hundreds of standards in the jazz repertoire, she chooses her favorites based on “how a song makes you feel and how it speaks to your soul.”

Sotelo continues, “After working through it, after listening to it over and over, [a song] eventually becomes your own.”

Nathan Cone / TPR

“I actually remember the first time I came to San Antonio,” pianist Martina Filjak told me following her April recital at Laurel Heights United Methodist Church. “I really enjoyed the city. I think I really fell in love with San Antonio on first sight and it seems, really, that the love was mutual.”

Hilmy

“I think ten years ago I approached the organ similarly to how I play the piano, and then I started to realize that certain things just didn't work as well,” says Doc Watkins, explaining the different technique required to switch from his normal instrument, piano, to the Hammond B3 at Jazz, TX.

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