Nathan Cone

Director of Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways To Connect

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Trish Murphy was one of the hardest-working (and hardest rocking) women among a new crop of Texas singer-songwriters to emerge in the 1990s, including Sara Hickman, Terri Hendrix, Kelly Willis and Mary Cutrufello. Murphy first began performing publicly with her brother Darin in her native Houston before striking out on her own after moving to Austin in 1996.

D. T. Buffkin is too good to be bad. The self-described “non-traditionalist old-timey punk rock n’ roll” group started playing gigs a few years ago at local joints on the St. Mary’s strip. They have a pretty incredible range of influences, from Bad Religion to Howlin’ Wolf to Merle Haggard.

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When Mason Ruffner hit the stage at the Cibolo Creek Country Club in 1997 [audio at the bottom of the page], it was an unusually fertile time for the Fort Worth-born guitarist and songwriter. He had just released Evolution on Archer Records, after a 10-year wait following his last release, and was only two years away from the bluesy, horn-driven You Can’t Win. Over the previous decade, though, CBS/Epic Records had dropped him.

Courtesty of The Criterion Collection.

In a 2005 essay for NPR’s “This I Believe” series, filmmaker Errol Morris laid out the personal philosophy behind his documentary filmmaking: “Truth is not relative, it's not subjective. It may be elusive or hidden, people may wish to disregard it, but there is such a thing as truth.” Documentaries, by their nature, are created not through an illusory omnipresent eye, but by a person, and from the perspective of that person.

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