Nathan Cone

Director of Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Droning organ sounds, piano fragments, rainy-day strings, a choir, and even the shortwave sound of mysterious “numbers” stations come together on Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s debut release on the classically oriented Deutsche Grammophon label. The album, “ Orphée ,” is loosely tied to the Orpheus myth, or rather the Roman poet Ovid’s telling of it within the “Metamorphosis.” Jóhannsson writes in the liner notes that the poem’s themes of death and rebirth seemed applicable to the...

I grew up a fan of National League ball thanks to the Houston Astros. Even though they’ve now defected to the American League, I still hold a place in my heart for NL teams, so I’ve been rooting for the Cubs to win the World Series. And while the both the Chicago Symphony and Cleveland Orchestras have long storied histories with many, many great recordings to their credit, I was delighted to see Cleveland bring their ‘A’ game to Game Seven for a Classical World Series win. Members of the...

Nathan Cone

Mezzo-soprano Julie Boulianne was forthright in the description of her recent recital for the Tuesday Musical Club . “I’m from Quebec, we tell the truth no matter what!” she joked, before explaining that her program was made up largely of already-familiar-to-her repertoire because she’s in between debut roles in two different opera companies. It was to the audience’s benefit, though. Boulianne possessed a beautiful control of her voice, both in melody and volume for the hall, Laurel Heights...

U.S. Army

For decades, military bands have served as a bridge between the armed forces and the public. During the 1950s through the 1970s, one such band was stationed here in San Antonio at Fort Sam Houston. This Sunday at 5:30 p.m., Fort Sam’s current musical ensemble, the 323d Army Band , welcomes up to 60 former members of the U.S. 4th Army Band , about 20 of whom will join the Fort Sam’s own for a performance that is free and open to the public. Chief Warrant Officer Jonathan Ward is the 323d Army...

Caroline Bitten

The San Antonio Chamber Music Society opens their 74 th season on Sunday, October 22 with the Danish String Quartet , returning to Texas, but visiting San Antonio for the very first time with a program that balances darkness and light. The first half of the program is dominated by Dmitri Shostakovich’s haunting Quartet No. 15, written in 1974; the composer would die less than a year later. Its six movements are played without interruption, and as violinist Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen explains, it...

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