Nathan Cone

VP, Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media. His reporting and criticism has been honored by the Houston Press Club and Texas Associated Press.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Nathan Cone / TPR

For the second year in a row, San Antonio is putting its best foot forward at Austin’s South By Southwest Festival, and according to Choose San Antonio’s Executive Director Meghan Garza-Oswald they’ve been successful at that. The non-profit's goal is to introduce the city to a broader audience so that it'll be seen as a viable place for outsiders to live, work, and play.

Nathan Cone / TPR

To get to San Antonio's Northeast School of the Arts Cinema Lab, you first walk into the imposingly-sized Lee High School (which feels like it’s tripled its size since NESA opened in 1997), then head underground and down a long hallway. A nondescript door opens onto a semi-darkened room where a dozen or so students are studying the latest “Alien” movie trailer on one wall of the classroom.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Over 16 years at San Antonio's Northeast School of the Arts (NESA), Konise Millender has seen and shepherded hundreds of films to production. She's the head of the Department of Cinema at the magnet school based on the Lee High School campus. This year, one of the seniors in the program, Pierson Hawkins, has a short film in the South By Southwest Film Festival in Austin. I took the opportunity to finally visit the cinema lab at NESA to learn more about the program, where I spoke to Millender.

Kino Lorber

At Austin’s South By Southwest Film Festival last year, a documentary listed on the schedule caught my eye with its one-word title, “Yarn.”

Marvel Studios

When Doctor Strange was introduced to the Marvel Universe back in 1963, the character opened up a whole new realm of mystical, magical possibilities, and so he did in 2016 as well, shaking up the Marvel Cinematic Universe with a trippy origin story that mostly eschews brawn for brains. And with its time and space-bending narrative, “Doctor Strange” is truly the—uh, well, strangest of the modern Marvel movies.

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