Nathan Cone

VP, Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media. His reporting and criticism has been honored by the Houston Press Club and Texas Associated Press.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

'The Graduate' At 40

Sep 9, 2007
© Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios, Inc. All rights reserved.

Thinking back on "The Graduate," most of us remember its great lines, the embarrassingly funny scenes leading to Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman) leaping into bed with Mrs. Robinson, and the cathartic climax of the film as Elaine (Katharine Ross) and Ben escape their parents and their pre-destined futures for an uncertain life.

Discovery Theater

Jan 26, 2007
©Disney. All rights reserved.

Long before Animal Planet, the Discovery Channel, or even PBS' "Nature" graced American television screens, the Walt Disney studio popularized the nature film as something not just for biologists to study, but for the average moviegoer to enjoy in the theater.  Through their series of "True Life Adventures," the average American was able to travel to far-flung corners of the world, from Africa, Asia, and South America, to remote areas of North America.  Beginning with "Seal Island" in 1948, and for the next twelve years, the public embraced these charming documentaries, and so did Oscar.  E

Jackie Earle Haley began his career as a young man in films like "The Bad News Bears" and "Breaking Away," but in the 1980s, the roles started disappearing.  So he went into film and video production, and moved to San Antonio. He formed JEH Productions to produce commercials for notable San Antonio clients.  But now he's back on the big screen in "Little Children," starring alongside Kate Winslet, Patrick Wilson, and Jennifer Connelly.

Bob Gibson or Nolan Ryan? Who would you pick for your ultimate fantasy baseball team? Texas Public Radio's Nathan Cone sat down with former Houston Astros pitcher and manager Larry Dierker, whose book, "My Team: Choosing My Dream Team From My Forty Years In Baseball" is an illuminating look at the game from an insider's point-of-view.

WHV Home Entertainment

Was Busby Berkeley from Mars? Plenty of people interviewed on the extra features included in the new six-DVD "Busby Berkeley Collection" from Warner Bros. Home Video think so. They praise the legendary choreographer and director's kaleidoscopic musical sequences, marveling at how the guy was able to do such visionary work without any formal dance training. The very term "Berkeleyesque" has come to define a certain visual style.

Pages