Nathan Cone

VP, Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media. His reporting and criticism has been honored by the Houston Press Club and Texas Associated Press.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Harper Collins

The Century's Most Polarizing Auteur

Elia Kazan, by Richard Schickel

(Harper Collins) 

Courtesy of the Criterion Collection.

A seemingly simple film that reveals deeper levels of profundity upon further reflection, Roberto Rossellini's "The Flowers of St. Francis" is basically a series of vignettes that takes Italian neo-realism back to the 13th century. 

Upon watching the restored version of "Bambi" on DVD this week, I was struck by how familiar the story felt. Then I watched the accompanying documentary on the making of the film, wherein contemporary Disney staffers acknowledged their debt to this 1942 film when they scribed and animated "The Lion King." Long before Simba witnessed his father Mufasa's death on the African Serengeti, children worldwide experienced their first vision of birth, death, and rebirth through "Bambi."

The Criterion Collection

This year has seen some terrific releases on DVD, but none is better than the Criterion Collection's three-disc set, "The Battle of Algiers." First released in 1966, "The Battle of Algiers" was reissued in theaters across the country in 2004. It enjoyed a too-brief run in San Antonio in May 2004. The film's distributor, Rialto, told me that it didn't do too well in San Antonio so it was pulled after one week.

Drawing On The East

Oct 28, 2004
© Disney. All rights reserved.

For better or worse, the current state of cinema's animated output can be traced back to 1992's blockbuster film "Aladdin." Not only was it a groundbreaking film with its breakneck pace, marvelous songs, and increased use of computer-aided animation, but it also established the "star turn" in animated films, with its zany genie voiced by Robin Williams.

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